The Heart of the Ventana

This post is the third installment of a series on the Ventana Double Cone region, which features arguably the most rugged and wild coastal terrain in the contiguous United States. The first post described a repeat of “The Drain” route with a mini-loop addition to visit the stunning “Ventana Spires” and the second post detailed the Ventana Triple Crown which is a spectacular high ridge traverse from South Ventana Cone to Ventana Cone to Ventana Double Cone including several rocky and remote intermediary summits. This last posts describes a point-to-point route up beautiful Ventana Creek past 50 ft Ventana Falls to La Ventana (aka The Window) and Kandblinder Peak carrying over into the Little Sur drainage to finish at Bottcher’s Gap. This was one of the more rugged adventures I’ve done including Ventana Creek’s beautiful gorges and cascades amid old growth redwoods, the extremely remote and stunning Ventana Falls, an ultra-steep climb up to the namesake geographical feature of the Ventana Wilderness (La Ventana aka The Window), and spectacular views from Kandlbinder. From Ventana Camp to Jackson Camp it was an arduous but rewarding adventure over terrain that is grand, awe-inspiring and humbling at the same time – the heart of the Ventana. Full album here. GPS route hereThe route begins at Big Sur Station with some trail miles on the Pine Ridge Trail above the Big Sur River gorge. After 4 miles on the Pine Ridge Trail descend to Ventana Camp along the Big Sur River. Follow the Big Sur River downstream a short distance and then take a use path to the entrance of Ventana Creek. Ventana Creek is an amazing creek walk including narrow gorges with small waterfalls and rapids in a setting of lush redwoods, ferns and moss. The creek wading is often not optional since the walls of the canyon periodically come right down to the water course. Walking up Ventana Creek there is a strong sense of remoteness as few have traveled up this unspoiled waterway. Ventana Creek is not an advisable place to be in higher volume creek flow and there is ample evidence of the power of the water that comes down this canyon during winter storms.  It’s fairly slow going wading in the creek with innumerable step overs, immense redwood log jams, clear pools, small waterfalls and other obstacles to climb through, up and under. However, as creek walks go Ventana Creek is fairly efficient.  Near the confluence with the East Fork Ventana Creek the forest canopy parts for a moment providing glimpses of the cliffs and rocky buttresses of Ventana Double Cone, the Queen of the Ventana, presiding over a rugged region that is unmatched in the coastal mountain ranges of the west coast of the United States. After about 5.5 miles of creek walking in Ventana Creek, one gets a sense of the canyon walls closing in with a headwall approaching. First there is a thin falls coming coming in from the right on a tributary flowing off Kandlbinder. Then, a few feet later one rounds a corner and is treated to Ventana Falls, which tumbles an estimated 50 feet over reddish and white cliffs into a nearly circular amphitheater. Evidence of rocks and vegetation strewn about the base of the falls indicates it is very flashy during periods of heavy rains, but since it’s very close to the headwaters it appears flow returns to relatively light shortly thereafter. Ventana Falls is not particularly high and it does not maintain high volume, but it’s extremely remote setting in a reddish amphitheater of cliffs is stunning.

Getting around Ventana Falls to access the terrain upstream is perhaps the crux of the route. A few feet downstream of the falls is a loose gully in an active rock slide zone. There appears to be two options to get around the falls from here. The first option is to ascend the gully a short distance and find a way to climb a short vertical step of reddish rock. This rock is crumbly so extreme care must be taken. The second option is to ascend the gully about 100 vertical feet. About midway up the gully the loose rock is interspersed with solid bedrock. Carefully ascend the rock and look for a non-technical traverse that can be taken to exit the gully and access easier terrain that leads back down to Ventana Creek above the falls. Regardless of which route is chosen, the rock is extremely loose so caution must be taken with each move. Above the falls, the creek is characterized by a lot of large talus blocks which provide an efficient means of travel and gaining elevation as the grade becomes steeper. The creek disappears at times under talus so make sure to fill up water while it’s still easy to access.   At a broad, open section of talus, the main drainage curves into the Drain which flows up toward Ventana Double Cone, but to access the Window take a smaller gully to the left. This gully ultimately leads toward Kandlbinder, so one must be on the lookout for shallow gullies that trend up and right toward the Window. It seems there are several shallow gullies at the bottom but the correct one ascends toward the vertical cliff band that descends off the east side of La Ventana. I found the most solid talus to be immediately beneath these cliffs on the right side of the gully. The route up to La Ventana is a straightforward, albeit steep talus climb with no technicalities encountered. While the views from the Window proper are mostly obscured by the vegetation, there are excellent vistas of Ventana Double Cone and the Ventana Creek drainage on the way up. Immediately above La Ventana is a pinnacle that forms the western high point of the window frame.  This pinnacle has arguably the best view of the Ventana Double Cone region. At your feet is a sweeping vista of the rugged cliffs and buttresses above the east side of the Window stretching down into the Drain and the western face of Ventana Double Cone. It’s an awe-inspiring panorama that is unmatched in the Ventana in terms of the sheer ruggedness.From The Window or its western pinnacle it may be tempting to stay on the ridge crest which contains plentiful deadfall and brush. While this route on top of the ridge is feasible, it is definitely easier and likely faster to traverse on the north side of the ridge utilizing open terrain amid Santa Lucia Fir and talus. After some traversing a talus gully leads back toward the ridge crest where the final climb along the ridge to Kandlbinder is on open terrain with excellent views looking back to Ventana Double Cone. Kandlbinder is an awesome spot to soak in the 360 degree views including the entire Little Sur River drainage with Pico Blanco, Post Summit and Cabezo Prieto, Ventana Double Cone and the Drain, the Big Sur River drainage and distant views all the way to Cone Peak and Junipero Serra. The descent off Kandlbinder is a bit arduous on loose talus and scree fields, but one can find some plunge stepping lanes on the edges of the main rock gully. From the bottom of Kandlbinder’s gully, walk down the drainage (the headwaters of the LIttle Sur River) until a very small climb leads up and over a saddle into the Jackson Creek drainage. At this point a use path becomes more defined and as one descends into Jackson Creek it’s important to stay on this use path which is fairly efficient in its upper portion. As the use path descends further into the Jackson Creek drainge there is increasing deadfall to negotiate but the general idea is stay near the creek alternating sides to utilize the path of least resistance. While going down Jackson Creek is certainly easier than going up, it’s not a great deal amount faster due to all of the blowdowns. Near the bottom of Jackson Creek is pretty Firehose Falls with a small but beautiful pool. The confluence with the Little Sur River is just beyond. While there are several crossings of the Little Sur River, the trail becomes much easier to Jackson Camp and on to Pico Blanco Boyscout Camp and finally the dirt road up to Bottcher’s Gap.  

Ventana Triple Crown

Deep within the Ventana Wilderness along a high ridge that separates the Carmel River drainage from the Big Sur River drainage lies some of the most remote, wild and unforgiving coastal terrain in the United States. Along this ridge are the three “Ventana Cones” including Ventana Double Cone, Ventana (single) Cone and South Ventana Cone. While there is a history of exploration and climbs along this ridge, Bob Burd was the first person to envision a traverse of this entire ridge in a single day including summits of all three Ventana Cones, a route he coined the “Ventana Triple Crown.” After a couple failed attempts, Bob succeeded his dayhike aspirations in 2006, a feat that has not been repeated until now. I have done several routes to get acquainted with the terrain of this amazing region including visits to Kandlbinder, the Window (aka La Ventana), Ventana Double Cone, Ventana (single) Cone and the Ventana Spires. Over time I became intrigued by the ridge and the collection of rocky summits between Ventana Double Cone and Ventana (single) Cone.  Completing the Triple Crown offered a great way to explore this extremely remote and rugged stretch. The volume of experiences I’ve had in the area enabled me to carefully study the terrain and utilize the path of least resistance. Admittedly, the path of least resistance still entailed much resistance, but I knew what to expect and doing my homework certainly helped as I was able to complete the Triple Crown in 14 hours, 15 minutes roundtrip from the China Camp TH of the Pine Ridge Trail. It was both a mentally and physically challenging journey, but it was also incredibly rewarding and a route that I enjoyed a lot, as manifested by the nearly 500 (!) photographs that I took. I look forward to further explorations in this amazing region and also repeating the Triple Crown.  GPS route here.  Full photo album hereOverview of the Triple Crown from Mount Manuel below: Chaparral & Santa Lucia Firs: Much of the difficulty of the Triple Crown is due to the unavoidable bushwhacking through California chaparral, a hardy, drought-adapted mix of shrubs that covers much of the land and includes ceanothus, chamise, oak scrub and manzanita. The chaparral provides copious fuel to fires that periodically sweep over the ridges and down into the canyons. The same fires also encourage explosive reproduction of the shrubs and in as little as four years the chaparral can return as thick as ever, sometimes so thick that it is virtually impenetrable. On rocky, mostly north facing slopes, a rare forest of Santa Lucia Fir can be found. Endemic to the Santa Lucia Mountains and the rarest fir in the world, the Santa Lucia Fir is not fire resistant, but has survived in these mountains by habituating fireproof terrain on rocky slopes and the bottom of moist canyons. This amazing tree is symbolic of the Ventana Wilderness with its slender, spire-like form. The largest concentration of Santa Lucia Firs in the world can be found in the canyons and peaks of the upper Carmel River watershed. Often times, the steep, rocky terrain characteristic of the Santa Lucia Fir habitat is the ticket to efficient travel. The 2008 Basin Complex fire roared through this area of the Ventana with ferocious speed and heat leaving a maze of deadfall in spots. However, it appears the Santa Lucia Fir forest largely survived, a testament to the fir’s unique adaptability in a region where fires occur periodically.    The Intermediary Summits: There are several intermediary summits along the ridge connecting the three Ventana Cones with no official names. Several of these summits are worthy of distinction for their prominence, location and outstanding character. Moreover, passing over these intermediary summits entail some of the most arduous terrain on the route. For reference, I have dubbed Peak 4,455 between Pine Ridge and Ventana Cone as “Blue Peak” since it has a commanding view of the Blue Creek drainage. Peak 4,387, located north of Ventana Cone is arguably the most impressive unnamed summit in the Ventana with steep, cliffy terrain on all sides. In particular, the southwest face of Peak 4,387 is an impressive cliff facade overlooking the Lion Creek drainage. Thus, “Lion Rock” seems like a fitting name for this awesome summit. Peak 4,260+ does not even get a marker on the USGS map, but it’s a prominent summit along the ridge and also overlooking the wild headwaters of the East Fork Ventana Creek. The point is also a milestone on the Triple Crown traverse. When viewed from Ventana Double Cone, Peak 4,260+ has a rounded top characteristic of knobs with a Santa Lucia Fir forest in a scree gully on its north slope. Thus, “Ventana Knob” seems like an appropriate name. Finally, Peak 4,452 is labelled on the map, but there are actually three high points along the narrow ridge separating Ventana Mesa Creek and the unnamed creek draining the north side of Ventana (single) cone. The label on the USGS map is placed on what is the middle high point, but the highest point is actually the southern point (verified by GPS) by a few feet. The northern point along the ridge is considerably lower than its southern neighbors, but is still a prominent point along the ridge.  All three high points contain impressive cliff faces, particularly on their southeast sides, with sharp drops on all sides and pointy summits so the “Ventana Spires” is a very apt name to describe these three rugged pinnacles with south, middle and north spires used to identify each of the three high points. Preparation:  There are several aspects of this route which require planning. First, and perhaps the most critical aspect of this route, is water, or lack thereof. There is no water source from Pine Ridge all the way to past Ventana Double Cone. Essentially the entire off-trail portion of the route does not have water. There is water in the canyons beneath the ridge but the water is several hundred to over a thousand vertical feet below ridge and difficult to access at best. Thus, one must plan to carry sufficient water for several hours of bushwhacking on an exposed ridge or risk dehydration. The first reliable source of water on the trail without a side trip is beneath Puerto Suello Gap. Reliable water can be found near Lone Pine Camp with a short detour. The lack of water on the ridge is closely related to the second important aspect: weather. As the ridge is exposed to direct sunlight most of the way, it is not a good idea to be up there when it is hot or when there is any kind of inclement weather or limitation on visibility. I did the traverse on a relatively cool spring day and I still found it hot in the middle of the day. Attempting the route on a warmer day increases the difficulty proportionately and being on the ridge on a hot day (typical of late spring and summer) would be tortuous and would require substantially more water, amounts that could be prohibitively heavy and cumbersome to carry efficiently through the brush. Third, come prepared for full-on bushwhacking. There is some unavoidable brush and sharp deadfall, particularly between Ventana (single) Cone and Ventana Double Cone, that will shred any exposed skin. It is critical to cover the legs with durable material. You cannot have hesitation charging through the brush and dead vegetation to get through some sections with any kind of decent forward progress. For clarification, decent forward progress can be as little as 1 mph in this brushy, complex terrain. Fourth, understand the topography. The first leg between Pine Ridge and Ventana (single) Cone has fairly gentle topography with light to moderate brush. Most of the time-consuming complexities and arduous terrain is located after Ventana (single) Cone and it persists all the way to  Ventana Double Cone. There are several sharp drops between the intermediary summits of Lion Rock, Ventana Knob and the Ventana Spires with incredibly thick brush to avoid and copious sharp deadfall and trees to engage in bushwhacking gymnastics. The terrain is much steeper and contains cliffs with some unavoidable rock scrambling. It definitely pays to study this section carefully and anticipate that the segment between Ventana (single) Cone and Ventana Double Cone will take significantly longer than the segment between South Ventana Cone and Ventana (single) Cone. The Route: The route begins at the China Camp TH with the first several miles along the Pine Ridge Trail to Church Creek Divide. This stretch of trail is immensely scenic with excellent views into the Church Creek drainage and also views to Ventana (single) Cone and Ventana Double Cone. From Church Creek Divide, the Pine Ridge Trail traverses a number of drainages as it traverses to Pine Ridge. The most prominent drainage contains the headwaters of the Carmel River and is the last reliable source of water all the way to Lone Pine Spring or the stream below Puerto Suello Gap. It may be tempting to climb South Ventana Cone directly from the Pine Ridge Trail but the upper section is choked with thick brush. Better to save the energy for later. Instead, continue along the Pine Ridge Trail to the junction with the Black Cone Trail and take the Black Cone Trail south to the southwest side of Ventana Double Cone where there is a corridor of light brush to the summit. The SW side requires pushing through a short section of very thick brush beside the trail, but just above the southwest slope is user friendly and becomes less brushy as one ascends.  The SW slope is likely the most efficient way to reach South Ventana Cone in present conditions (i.e. no fire in a number of years). After South Ventana Cone retrace steps to the Black Cone/Pine Ridge junction and head toward Pine Ridge on faint use paths. A few majestic ponderosa pines survived the Basin fire and the view from the reddish summit rocks is spectacular. The descent from Pine Ridge is fairly efficient as there are wide swaths of open ground between the bushes. Eventually the open ground becomes lesser and the brush closes in requiring some light to moderate bushwhacking. This bushwhacking continues through the low point between Pine Ridge and Blue Peak but once on the upper part of the ridge to Blue Peak the terrain opens up and the final part is an easy walk on rocks to the summit of Blue Peak. From Blue Peak there is more brush to contend with leading to another intermediary summit. I found it best to stay a few feet below the ridge crest on the south side on this section. At the intermediary summit Ventana Cone appears close and the brush becomes lighter for the final stretch to the summit of Ventana Cone. The view from Ventana Cone is stellar and includes all of the remaining highpoints on the way to Ventana Double Cone. From Ventana Cone, descend several hundred feet on the north side of the ridge through Santa Lucia Fir forest and traverse talus slopes and Santa Lucia Firs toward the pass between Ventana Cone and Lion Rock, but stay below the pass. Ascend Lion Rock remaining on the north side of the ridge utilizing more talus in Santa Lucia Firs. Near the top of Lion Rock regain the ridge and ascend the final rocks to the summit. The summit area is surprisingly spacious with some relatively flat rocks. Descending the north side of Lion Rock entail some downclimbing through rocks. The next section was severely burned by the Basin fires leaving a maze of dead trees and branches to navigate. New brush is beginning to sprout through the dead vegetation in spots making forward progress especially taxing. The going is especially tough just after a small pass between Lion Rock Ventana Knob. Eventually, the brush gives way to a pleasant open stretch of grass and yuccas that leads almost all the way to the top of Ventana Knob. Ventana Knob has one of the best views in the Ventana looking across to the rugged South Arete of Ventana Double Cone and the towering Ventana Spires and down the wild East Fork Ventana Creek.From Ventana Knob, downclimb some rock and then take a scree gully down through Santa Lucia Firs. Once below cliffs on the skiers right, veer toward Heartbreak Pass, so named because of incredibly thick brush that grows in this low point. Before reaching Heartbreak Pass, traverse west through some brush to a talus gully, which is the ticket to avoiding the thick brush above Heartbreak Pass. Most of the way up the talus gully is a convenient chute that leads to the ridge below the South Ventana Spire. This chute has some fun third class scrambling on solid rock in the lower part which transitions to second class loose talus on the upper part. From the ridge, the summit of South Ventana Spire, the highest spire, is a short third class scramble away. At Ventana Spires most of the complexities of the Triple Crown have already been overcome. It may appear that brush has taken over the entire saddle between the Ventana Spires and Ventana Double Cone, but the thick brush can largely be avoided by staying on the left side near the cliffs that drop into the East Fork Ventana Creek. In fact, this terrain includes some enjoyable scrambling on blocky third class rock. From Ventana Double Cone, it’s all trail back to the China Camp Trailhead, but still many miles fairly of overgrown trails. As of this writing, the Ventana Double Cone trail is overgrown but has seen some substantial work to clear out the brush and blowdowns. The upper mile of the Puerto Suello Trail was cleared of dozens of blowdowns which is incredibly helpful. The middle part is still a challenge with some overgrown parts and blowdowns while the final stretch into Hiding Canyon Camp is in good condition. From Hiding Canyon Camp, cross the Carmel River and head up Hiding Canyon on the Carmel River Trail, which has become quite overgrown through this section. The trail becomes better on the final climb into Pine Valley. It’s a pleasure to come through Pine Valley with its lovely pastures and forest of ponderosa pine. From Pine Valley, it’s up to Church Divide and retracing steps on the Pine Ridge Trail back to China Camp Trailhead. 

The Drain & Ventana Spires

This post covers the first in a series of routes in the Ventana Double Cone region which features arguably the most rugged and wild coastal terrain in the contiguous United States. This first route is a repeat of “The Drain” route I did last year with Joey Cassidy with a mini-loop addition to visit the “Ventana Spires” which are stunning rocky pinnacles situated on a narrow ridge across from Ventana Double Cone with the headwaters of Ventana Mesa Creek in between. The next two posts will detail (1) the Ventana Triple Crown which is a spectacular high ridge traverse from South Ventana Cone to Ventana Cone to Ventana Double Cone and (2) a point-to-point route up beautiful Ventana Creek past 50 ft Ventana Falls to The Window (aka La Ventana) and Kandblinder carrying over into the Little Sur drainage to finish at Bottcher’s Gap.  Strava GPS route for the Drain and Ventana Spires hereMy route on this day was a repeat of the Drain Route from April 2014 plus a mini-loop to visit the awesome Ventana Spires.  The Drain became one of my favorite routes that I’ve done when I did it in April 2014 so I knew it was amazing, but I was still in awe of the sheer ruggedness and beauty of the cirque between Kandlbinder and Ventana Double Cone on the second time. In fact, this time may have been more enjoyable knowing that the route would go without issue. The Ventana Creek cirque provides a real sense of adventure in a truly wild canyon that is rugged and unspoiled and it was a pleasure to revisit. A route description and more details on the Drain route between Kandlbinder and Ventana Double Cone can be found here, but I’ve included a whole bunch of photos in this post from this year’s trip through the drain.    After completing the Drain route and topping out on Ventana Double Cone, I descended into the headwaters of Ventana Mesa Creek via an efficient gully through Santa Lucia Fir groves and talus. From the creek I took another steep talus gully with some rock scramblingn up to the Ventana Spires, which have remarkably rugged and precipitous SE faces. “Ventana Spires” is an unofficial name for these rocky pinnacles, but seems very fitting. Their position in the most remote region of the wilderness makes them particularly special. Few people have have stood atop the spires. There are three prominent points along the ridge make up the Ventana Spires and I’ve chosen to call them the north, middle and south Ventana Spires. The spires increase in height from north to south. From the north spire the ridge continues north gradually losing elevation on terrain that looks fairly brush free; a potential future project to explore down the ridge. Drain Spires routeDrain Spires route closeThe middle spire has an impressive view of the south spire with the wild east fork of Ventana Creek in the background. The south spire has perhaps the most dramatic view looking back to the middle spire and its sheer SE cliffs. All of the spires have amazing views across the expanse of wilderness and Santa Lucia Firs to Ventana Cone including the intermediary summits I dubbed “Lion Rock” and “Ventana Knob.”  I traversed the two highest spires (Middle and South) and then descended to the saddle between the Ventana Spires and Ventana Double Cone (VDC). Last time I experienced some thick brush in this section, but this time I was able to avoid most of the brush by staying on the south side of the ridge where there was a corridor of brush free scrambling between the cliffs and the brush. The 3rd class scrambling on the Ventana Spires traverse and the East Ridge of VDC were highly enjoyable in a stunning setting. I enjoyed the afternoon light from VDC and then began the trail run back to Bottcher’s Gap along the Ventana Double Cone Trail to Pat Springs and the Skinner Ridge Trail from pat Springs to Bottcher’s Gap. The Ventana Double Cone Trail from the summit to Puerto Suello Gap was characteristically overgrown. As usual, the cold and clear water at Pat Springs was a most welcome sight. Strava GPS route for the Drain and Ventana Spires here

Waterfalls of Big Sur

Updated April 15, 2015 to include Pine Falls and Lower Pine Falls

While most of the content on this blog is based on photography and experiences from specific trips, I occasionally like to produce special posts that gather my thoughts from numerous experiences into a cohesive list. This special post includes a description and photos from a couple dozen waterfalls I have visited in the Big Sur region, from cataracts deep in the most remote and wild corners of the Ventana Wilderness to the easily accessible falls near the highway. The Big Sur region has incredible topographical relief from the summits of the Santa Lucia Mountains down to the rocky shores of the Pacific Ocean so it should come as no surprise that the rugged canyons draining the peaks hold many amazing waterfalls. This list includes a photo of each falls I have visited along with a short description. Where I have made a video of a falls I have also included the video footage as I have come to discover that video is a particular great medium to caputre the movement of water. While this is a fairly comprehensive catalog of the waterfalls in the Big Sur region, including the Silver Peak and Ventana Wilderness, there are several falls I have yet to visit. I plan to update this post as I visit these falls, although it may take some time as several of them require substantial rainfall for optimal viewing which may not happen until next winter.

  • Last Chance Falls (120 ft): When in flow, Last Chance Falls is arguably the most dramatic waterfall in the Ventana Wilderness. The falls flow over an overhanging precipice in an impressive free fall with a large cavern behind the falls. A natural amphitheater of cliffs surrounds the falls and the setting surrounding the falls is fit for a scene out of Jurassic Park. The ephemeral nature of Last Chance Falls makes it particularly special and requires planning, or more accurately, waiting for the ideal conditions which occur during a small window after heavy rains.   
  • Canogas Falls (80 ft total):  Located deep in Devils Canyon which drains the remote north side of Cone Peak, Canogas Falls is one of the most stunning waterfalls in Big Sur. The falls includes a series of three steps with spectacular turquoise pools in between each step. The falls is nestled between rugged cliffs with a lush redwood forest at the base of the falls making it a magical setting. While Canogas Falls is within the Ventana Wilderness, access entails passing through Big Creek Reserve which is closed to the public for all but one day of the year. 
  • Pick Creek Falls (80 ft): A picturesque falls which shoots over a ledge with an 80 ft free-fall into a large, clear pool surrounded by a lovely grove of old growth Santa Lucia Firs (Abies bracteata aka Bristlecone Fir), with their unmistakable slender, spire-like stature. The Santa Lucia Fir is endemic to the northern part of the Santa Lucia Mountains and the rarest fir in the world. An impressive rock amphitheater surrounds Pick Creek Falls with hanging ferns making a magical setting. Also in the vicinity are the beautiful bathtubs at Bathtub Creek. Creek walking downstream of Pick Creek Falls features more spectacular gorges and cascades all the way to the confluence with the South Fork Big Sur River with more Santa Lucia Firs lining the stream.                      
  • Ventana Falls (50 ft est.): Arguably the most remote falls in all of the Ventana and Big Sur, this stunning falls is not easy to reach as it entails a 5 mile creek walk along beautiful Ventana Creek from Ventana Camp. The rock facade surrounding the falls is especially striking with white and reddish rock. The creek walk to reach the falls entails numerous log jams, gorges, clear blue pools, and cascades. Ventana Falls guards access to the terrain upstream which is arguably the most rugged, wild and awe-inspiring in any coastal area of the contiguous United States. Bypassing the falls is not trivial and entails a scramble on loose rock.     
  • Carmel River Falls and Gorge (40 ft est.): Deep in the Carmel River canyon is a remarkable gorge that is one of the highlights of the Carmel River and in my opinion, the entire Ventana. The gorge contains towering cliffs, a deep pool, a beautiful slick rock cascade and a major waterfall along the main stem of the Carmel River. This extremely rugged section of the river is remarkably hidden despite the Carmel River Trail and Round Rock Camp Trail passing nearby.
  • Pine Falls (40 ft est.): Pine Falls is located near the headwaters of the Carmel River about three quarters of a mile downstream from lovely Pine Valley. As such, flow over the falls is rarely large, but the falls is particularly aesthetic with a section of free fall and a large clear pool. The setting is lush with moss clinging to the rocks and a very pretty forest of old growth Santa Lucia firs fills the canyon. 
  • Lower Pine Falls (est. 100 ft aggregate): Located less than a quarter of a mile downstream of Pine Falls, it appears few people know about Lower Pine Falls but it’s an impressive sight and very different in character from Pine Falls making it worthy of a visit. There is no large pool at Lower Pine Falls. Instead, the falls is a series of large cascades over smooth bedrock scrubbed clean of moss. This smooth bedrock is rather hazardous for climbing, but a hand line has been placed in the most precarious spot to assist. It’s a rather chaotic scene as the falls tumbles down the numerous steps strewn with large boulders and sculptured bedrock. The highest segment of the falls is the most impressive and concentrated while lower down the water course splits. This would be an amazing falls to see in higher flow.  
  • Salmon Creek Falls (100 ft est.): By all metrics Salmon Creek Falls is impressive: it has great volume with its location near Salmon Creek’s outlet into the ocean, its a strikingly tall falls, and the setting is stunning with a large pool, boulders and cliffs. The only detraction from an otherwise beautiful falls is its close proximity to the highway and the resultant overuse of the area and careless visitors leaving trash.  
  • Upper Salmon Creek Falls (25 ft): While only about a quarter of the height of the main Salmon Creek Falls with significantly less volume, Upper Salmon Creek falls possess a pristine and unfettered beauty that is lost at the main falls. Unlike the main falls, Upper Salmon Creek Falls is not easily accessible and it appears few venture to the shores of its large circular pool. Upper Salmon Creek Falls is a gem. Video footage above. 
  • Circular Pool #1 (15 ft est.):  The first circular pool along the Little Sur River is the largest pool of three and features the tallest falls and also the most vertical cliff amphitheater surrounding the pool. A large section of the cliff above the first pool collapsed over the winter depositing a large pile of rock debris into about 30% of the pool so for the time being the first circular pool is not very circular. Video footage of all three pools is below Circular Pool #3. 
  • Circular Pool #2 (5-10 ft steps): The second circular pool is significantly smaller than the first, both in size of the pool and height of its falls.  However, immediately above this pool lies a series of small cascades and mini-pools over slick rock that are stunning, particularly in periods of moderate flow.  In fact, this section is one of the highlights of the entire Little Sur River. Video footage of all three Circular Pools is below Circular Pool #3. 
  • Circular Pool #3 (12 ft est): The third circular pool is the culmination of a magnificent narrow gorge where the cliffs on both sides come right down into the river resulting a deep pool beneath the falls.   
  • Rainbow Falls (55 ft): Located about a half mile south of Rainbow Camp along the South Fork Trail, Rainbow Falls is along a small tributary of the South Fork Little Sur River. Visibility is limited from the South Fork Trail but a better view can be found just off the trail. The falls never has much volume so it is best viewed after winter rains. What makes Rainbow Falls so special is its extremely lush amphitheater of ferns and moss and the delicate nature of the falls as it plunges over a nearly vertical cliff. See video footage of Rainbow Falls in the Pick Creek Falls video above. 
  • Mocho Falls (total 40 ft est.): Mocho Falls has two distinct steps, but what is most fascinating about this rarely seen falls is a twisty chasm of elegantly sculpted and polished rock separating the two steps. The depth of the chasm and its twisty nature is such that it is virtually impossible to see both steps of the falls at the same time. The lower step is an estimated 20 ft and drops into a spectacular circular amphitheater with a deep and large pool. The upper step is around 10 ft est. and within the narrow rock chute there are additional small steps.  
  • McWay Falls (75 ft): McWay Falls is an iconic spot and probably the most photographed natural feature in Big Sur. This is a must stop for tourists driving Highway 1 and there is often a line of cars parked along the road. Sometimes the area feels like the international terminal at SFO. The falls overlook is accessed by a paved path that is under a quarter mile. The many visitors to McWay Falls range from selfie enthusiasts to professional photographers. Thank goodness access to McWay Falls beach is forbidden and even for the non-law abiding crowd it’s not an easy proposition to get down to the beach (people have been rescued trying). Thus, even if the overlook is a zoo, you can forget about the crowds when you look out onto the picturesque scene of the falls tumbling into the pristine turquoise waters and an untrammeled beach.    
  • Limekiln Falls (90 ft): Limekiln Falls is located near the bottom of the Middle Fork Limekiln Creek which drains the region between Twin Peak and Cone Peak. It seems like everything in this region is grand and Limekiln Falls is no different. Unless flow is particularly high, the falls is split into two prongs. The cataract is easily accessed from the main area of Limekiln State Park and includes passage through a lush redwood forest complete with a dense carpet of sorrel.   
  • Mutt & Jeff Falls (Jeff 35 ft; Mutt 110 ft): Named by Dr. Jack Glendening after a comic strip named Mutt and Jeff created in 1907 lasting through 1983 with a tall and thin Mutt character and his short friend Jeff. In this case, the short Jeff Falls is the real attraction as it’s along the main stem of Santa Lucia Creek. After recent heavy rain Jeff Falls roars over a 35 cliff into a large, deep pool. Tall and thin Mutt Falls is located next to Jeff Falls on a small tributary with a series of steps totaling over 100 ft but never has high volume and is likely a trickle for a large potion of the year. The two falls can be viewed in tandem. See video footage of Jeff Falls in the Last Chance Falls video above. 
  • Ventana Mesa Falls (22 ft est.): Near the confluence of Ventana Mesa Creek and the Carmel River just downstream of the Carmel River gorge, Ventana Mesa Falls is an added attraction to the magic of the Carmel River gorge described above. The falls shoots over sloping slick rock with ferns and moss in a very pretty setting. 
  • Pothole Slide Falls (35 ft): Located next to the Lost Valley Trail as it descends into Lost Valley, Pothole slide falls is a series of two slides down a smooth rock face with a pool in between, the “pothole.” The falls is more horizontal than vertical and the drainage upstream is small so this falls is best viewed after recent rain. 
  • Upper McWay Falls (couple steps totaling 30 ft): Above McWay Falls is a beautiful redwood forest and a couple small waterfalls. Upper McWay Falls is one of these falls and includes a couple steps totaling around 30 ft. The lushness of the surrounding redwood forest and cliffs in the canyon makes this a nice falls. It is also located on the main stem of McWay Canyon Creek so flow is decent.   
  • McWay Canyon Falls (20 ft est.): The other falls above McWay Falls is McWay Canyon Falls which is located on a tributary of McWay Canyon Creek with commensurately less volume.  However, the falls is in a pretty setting with five finger ferns and the sprawling root system of a large redwood right next to it.    
  • Pico Blanco Camp Falls (15 ft est.): Pico Blanco Camp Falls is a lovely spot along the South Fork Little Sur River set amid old growth redwoods with a carpet of redwood sorrel. The falls is not large, but includes a blue pool beneath it and a lush surrounding of moss and ferns.  
  • Firehose Falls (15 ft est.): Located on Jackson Creek near its confluence with the Little Sur River, Firehose Falls spits off a ledge like a fire hose into a pretty pool surrounded by ferns and moss. See video footage of Firehose Falls in the Little Sur Circular Pools video above.  
  • Mocho Creek Falls (18 ft): Located just upstream of Mocho Creek’s confluence with the South Fork Little Sur River, Mocho Creek Falls is a pretty falls in a cliffy nook with a garden of hanging ferns beside it. 
  • Launtz Falls (100+ ft over multiple steps): Launtz Falls is at the base of  a small tributary descending from Launtz Ridge that flows into the Little Sur River. The bottom of the falls is visible from the usepath to Fox Usecamp and you can get a sense there is much more above, but it is not clearly visible unless you cross the Little Sur River and ascend the ultra steep slopes on the other side. Upon climbing the slopes a tall falls presents itself flowing over a lush cliff face.  See video footage of Firehose Falls in the Little Sur Circular Pools video above.   

Other Falls: Eagle Creek Falls, Cienega Falls, Jewel Falls, Vicente Falls, Pfieffer Falls

Little Sur Circular Pools 2015

The Circular Pools are a series of (you guessed it) three circular shaped pools in a very remote and wild section of the Little Sur River. The first pool contains the tallest falls and and largest pool. A huge chunk of the cliff amphitheater surrounding the pool recently fell into with rock debris covering up a portion (I estimate around 30%) making it non-circular for the time being. The second pool includes a series of beautiful cascades and mini-pools on slick rock that flow into the pool. The third pool is the culmination of a spectacular narrow gorge. Leading up to the first pool all the way through the third pool is an amazingly lush and rugged setting of pools, gorges, waterfalls, cascades and cliffs. Last year I visited the Circular Pools in January before it had rained so the falls were flowing very gently and the vegetation was relatively dry. I made it a point to revisit this gem of the Ventana after rains to see the pools and falls in their full glory. One week after a healthy rainfall I made my way back to the Circular Pools, this time venturing all the way to the third pool. I found delightful cascades, gushing waterfalls, and a remarkably green canyon of moss and ferns thanks to the rain. While it was beautiful the first time, this experience was on another level. The Cricular Pools are beautiful anytime, but especially after recent rain. GPS route hereThe trek to the Circular Pools entails an adventure up the wild and trail-less Little Sur River to an otherworldly scene of clear pools, delicate waterfalls, and precipitous cliffs deep in a lush, redwood filled canyon. The most straightforward access to the pools begins from Bottcher’s Gap where it’s 3.5 miles downhill on the dirt road to the Pico Blanco Boy Scout Camp. Just beyond the Scout Camp, the Jackson Camp Trail continues 1.5 miles to Jackson Camp. (Note: you can pre-arrange with the Boy Scout Camp to get a code to the locked gate and drive the dirt road down to the Camp and save some mileage but it’s not a great road for low clearance cars). The Jackson Camp Trail is in good shape and generally traverses on the slopes a couple hundred vertical feet above the Little Sur River.  The trail reaches Fish Camp where the first crossing of many Little Sur River crossings is located. The real Jackson Camp is only a couple river crossing away, but from Jackson Camp to Fox Usecamp there are numerous crossings of the Little Sur River (a total of 12 by one count). These crossings can be rock hops in low flow or thigh deep crossings after heavy rains. In general, it does not seem prudent to travel along the Little Sur River during a heavy rainy period or immediately thereafter. The official trail ends at Jackson Camp, but the use path to Fox Camp 1.3 miles upstream is fairly easy to follow with the numerous river crossings either obvious or marked with orange tape. This section features some truly immense redwoods that are a treat to pass underneath. These colossal trees have thrived deep in this canyon for centuries and the forest looks healthy considering the fire that roared through these mountains in 2008. Beyond Fox camp, the use path becomes more faint as it seems less people venture further upsteam. However, the general idea is the same: follow the river upstream and the use path virtually always coincides with the path of least resistance. The scenery is spectacular the entire way with smooth white river rocks littering the stream bed and alders, bay trees, and redwoods alongside the river. Soon after Fox camp, the canyon narrows considerably with precipitous cliffs closing in on the waterway. Usually the cliffs are only on one side of the river allowing fairly easy access on the opposite side, but in one section the Little Sur enters a small gorge with steep rock walls on both sides. After this narrow portion, the canyon opens a bit before narrowing once again just before reaching the first Circular Pool. At first only the sound of a waterfall can be heard, but as you round a bend around some rocks a paradisaical scene presents itself with a large pool virtually completely surrounded by cliffs. A section of these cliffs collapsed during a winter storm and deposited into the pool making it not-so-circular anymore. Time will tell if the power of water will rearrange the rockfall debris and become circular again. This rock amphitheater around the first pool contains an assortment of lush hanging vegetation including five finger ferns and mossThe first circular pool has the tallest waterfall and largest rock amphitheater, but more adventure lies upstream. A few feet downstream of the main pool a weakness in the cliffs on the north side allows passage upsteam. The next section of the Little Sur River features a series of small pools and cascades culminating in the second circular pool, which is significantly smaller, both in size of the pool and the waterfall plunging into it. This pool does not have an easy walk-around and a small rock step must be surmounted to proceed. A nylon rope aids in this climbing which is particularly helpful as the rock is slick, especially when downclimbing. After the second pool there is a sweet area of slick rock formations including a series of small pools and waterfalls. Beyond the second pool the river rounds a bend and enter perhaps the most dramatic section, a narrow gorge with vertical cliffs on both sides. This gorge culminates in the third circular pool and an impressive waterfall flowing over chiseled rock into the gorge. This third circular pool can by bypassed by climbing up above the gorge granting access to Bathtub Usecamp and beyond lies one of the most remote camps in the Ventana Wilderness (the North Fork Camp) located at the confluence of Puerto Suello Creek and the Little Sur River. On this day, I did not have time for additional exploration beyond the third circular pool so I look forward to returning soon to reach the remote upper reaches of the Little Sur River near North Fork Camp.  GPS route here

Pick Creek Loop

Pick Creek features some of the most beautiful creek walking I have seen in the Ventana Wilderness. The centerpiece is stunning Pick Creek Falls which shoots over a ledge with an 80 ft free-fall into a large, clear pool surrounded by lovely grove of old growth Santa Lucia Firs. Just downstream of Pick Creek Falls is a confluence with Bathtub Creek, which is aptly named since just upstream of this confluence are a series of gorgeous cascades and pools that look like bathtubs. Downstream of the confluence with Bathtub Creek, Pick Creek winds its way down a steep canyon to the South Fork Big Sur River. Along the way, the creek has numerous picturesque cascade and two impressive gorges with deep pools and small waterfalls. The gorges and pools are deep enough to require a bypass, each time on the north side of the creek. The entire canyon is filled with moss, ferns, cliffs and Santa Lucia Firs in a pristine setting.

Upon reaching the end of Pick Creek at its confluence with the South Fork Big Sur River, the fun does not end. While the South Fork Big Sur River is more mellow in its character than Pick Creek and there is a trail (albeit very faint in spots), the deep canyon features a remarkably beautiful forest composed of Santa Lucia Firs and Incense Cedars. In fact, the cedars are the dominant species in certain spots and many of the trees are old growth making this the largest and most intact grove of Incense Cedar that I have seen in the Santa Lucia Mountains, which are otherwise quite rare in teh range. Within about 0.5 miles of Rainbow Camp is picturesque Rainbow Falls, which tumbles into a lush amphitheater of ferns. The 55 ft falls is never a high volume falls since its upstream drainage is small, but its beauty lies in the lush setting and delicate nature. The Pick Creek Loop is an aesthetic 27 mile loop that I designed which packages all of the beauty of Pick Creek and the South Fork Big Sur described above, with some magnificent coastal scenery along Anderson Direct and the De Angulo Trail.  Along with dozens of photos of the scenery, the remainder of this post describes the sites and experiences along this phenomenal loop. I completed the loop a week after a winter storm with substantial rain and I recommend seeing it when the falls and creeks have decent flow. GPS track here.

The day started with one of the steeper climbs in Big Sur up 3,500+ feet from McWay falls to Anderson Peak. The brush on the lower part is filling in vigorously but the upper part is the same blowdown mess. Definitely an arudous route, but overall it’s still an efficient and scenic route to Anderson Peak from Hwy 1. Only three condors today. From Anderson Peak I ran north along Coast Ridge Road for 2 miles before dropping into the Pick Creek drainage. The upper part of Pick Creek drainage is fairly mellow with a valley including some nice meadows. Downstream of the meadows the cross country travel is fairly easy. The watercourse quickly becomes rugged requiring walking beside or in the watercourse and before I knew it I was on top of Pick Creek Falls, a picturesque 80 foot drop into a circular pool with hanging gardens of ferns. I especially like the setting of this falls amid Santa Lucia Firs. I went down to the pool and my timing was good as while I was there sunlight illuminated the entire falls. After enjoying the falls I headed downstream and took the Bathtub Creek tributary a short ways upstream to a series of pools and waterfalls known as the Bathtubs. I suspect there might be more pools further upstream that would be worth checking out next time. After the Bathtubs, I returned to Pick Creek and headed downstream to the South Fork Big Sur River. Pick Creek is stunning with numerous cascades, moss, ferns, and lined with Santa Lucia Firs the entire way. I followed the stream with two exceptions where the creek entered into narrow gorges withe deep pools and small waterfalls. The bypasses was fairly straightforward. Despite the creek walk in Pick Creek being time-consuming and arduous, it was bittersweet to reach South Fork Camp since I enjoyed Pick Creek so much. From South Fork Camp I was able to follow the South Fork Trail most of the way but there were a few sections that were uncertain. I enjoyed the forest of incense cedars and Santa Lucia Firs. I also saw the infamous South Fork wild board. There was an annoying blowdown section before Rainbow Falls, but that was soon forgotten when I saw the beautiful 50 foot falls with an amphitheater of hanging ferns. I went down to the base of the falls, had a snack, and then returned to the trail. Last time I was at Rainbow Falls it was merely a trickle so it was great to see it in flow and the fern gardens happy after recent rains. The final section of the South Fork Trail to Rainbow Camp is in great shape. From Rainbow Camp, it was up the Devils Staircase to Cold Springs and Coast Ridge Road. The ticks and other insects were out in abundance on this section, the downside to summer-like weather in February. I reached Cold Springs just after 5 pm and figured I had a chance to reach McWay Falls before darkness. I ran down the DeAngulo Trail with a pretty sunset and then hustled down Hwy 1 back to McWay Falls before the last light had faded. Another amazing day in the Ventana!  GPS track here.

Last Chance Falls

When in flow, Last Chance Falls is arguably the most dramatic waterfall in the Ventana Wilderness. The falls flows over an overhanging precipice with a 120 foot free fall with a large cavern behind the falls. A natural amphitheater of cliffs surrounds the falls. The ephemeral nature of Last Chance Falls perhaps makes it more special and requires planning, or more accurately, waiting, for the ideal conditions. The drainage upstream of the falls, the headwaters of the South Fork Santa Lucia Creek, is relatively small and in a climatologically dry part of the range. However, in early February an atmospheric river impacted the central coast interrupting months of virtually dry weather. Rainfall amounts were healthy over the Ventana Wilderness but particularly over the Santa Lucia Creek drainage, which is typically a drier region on the east side of the range but received impressive rainfall  totals of around ~6 inches in just a couple days. This provided a great opportunity to see Last Chance Falls in flow. By “in flow” I mean a solid stream of water from the top to the base of the falls. The falls becomes merely a trickle in summer and fall and otherwise has no flow or low flow for all but a handful days of the year immediately following heavy rains. This is a quintessential flashy waterfall, and especially flashy after an atmospheric river event during an unprecedented multi-year drought. GPS route here.

A great viewpoint of the falls is located on the Santa Lucia Trail as it switchbacks out of the Canyon. One can also travel cross country following the South Fork Santa Lucia Creek upstream to immediately underneath the falls with exploration of the pool and cavern. The setting of the falls is magical. Visiting Last Chance Falls also provides an opportunity to explore the immensely scenic Santa Lucia Creek gorge, including the 35 ft Jeff Falls, which is picturesque, particularly in the high flow we experienced. Next to Jeff Falls is Mutt Falls, a tall but skinny falls from a side tributary. Both Jeff and Mutt Falls are visible at the same time and are aptly named by Jack Glendening (http://bigsurtrailmap.net/ creator) after the historically popular comic strip with similarly proportioned characters.  Dr. Jack also named Last Chance Falls after the the camp downstream in beautiful meadows of the same name. In my opinion, Last Chance is a great name for this ephemeral falls.  Jeff Falls is much less flashy than Last Chance Falls since its water source includes the main stem of Santa Lucia Creek which drains a region several times the size of the South Fork Santa Lucia Creek alone. Thus, if Jeff Falls is running low, Last Chance Falls may be a trickle or bone dry.

As a shorthand, I’ve determined that flow of 250cfs or greater on the Arroyo Seco River will yield a an “in flow” Last Chance Falls but to really bring out the beauty of the falls it seem flow of 500cfs or greater is needed on the Arroyo Seco. The Santa Lucia Creek gorge entails several crossings of Santa Lucia Creek which was running high (Arroyo Seco was ~550 cfs on this day). If the flow was much higher the lower part of the Santa Lucia trail would be impassable. Thus, it would not be advisable to access Last Chance Falls via the Santa Lucia Creek gorge if at peak flow immediately after big rainfall events. Instead, use the Arroyo Seco-Indians Road and drop down into the drainage after the South Fork Santa Lucia Creek has branched off. The Arroyo Seco-Indians Road has some awesome views of the Arroyo Seco canyon and the interior of the Ventana Wilderness. Another great addition is the ridge immediately above the Arroyo Seco campground. A use path runs across the spine of this ridge and includes some fantastic views of the Arroyo Seco region.