Mineral, Needham, Sawtooth Loop

Mineral King is a high glacial valley at the south end of the Sierra Nevada nestled beneath the Great Western Divide. The valley has a long history of human interaction dating back to 19th century silver mining, and more recently, aspirations to turn the valley into a ski resort by Walt Disney. Fortunately, preservationists won this battle and Mineral King was protected for future generations by adding it to Sequoia National Park in 1978. While the entire valley is now a within the park, many structures remain as descendants from the original mining families continue to inhabit cabins. Fortunately, the cabins do not distract from the remote and wild feeling of the valley with its spectacular meadows and prominent granite peaks. Through late July, the valley is teaming with hungry marmots that have unfortunately developed an appetite for antifreeze fluid and it’s strongly recommended that all visitors wrap their car with a tarp. This is still a beautiful time to visit, but be mindful of the extra hassle.  In late summer the marmots are no longer a problem.  In late September and early October, groves of aspen which are fairly rare on the west side of the Sierra provide lovely fall colors. Gone are the days when of mining and ski resort speculation, Mineral King is now most popular with hikers and backpackers who are willing to brave the 20+ mile narrow and winding road to enjoy the natural splendor of the valley and the rugged granitescape beyond. There are many options for on-trail and off-trail hikes and numerous objectives in the region, but the following describes a very aesthetic loop including Mineral Peak, Needham Mountain and Sawtooth Peak.  More photos here.    Beginning at the Sawtooth Peak Trailhead take the trail up to the turnoff for Crystal Lake. The Sawtooth Peak Trail was cut along a forested hillside with very gradual switchbacks. The moderate grade makes for a pleasant run of what would otherwise be a frustratingly slow walk. Open meadows and firs at the bottom transition to southern foxtail pines which are always a pleasure to walk among. The Crystal Lake Trail gets much less use than the Sawtooth Peak Trail that leads to the Monarch Lakes and after a traverse begins a moderately steep climb up to a small notch along the west ridge of Mineral Peak. From this notch, the trail traverses into meadows above Crystal Creek before making a series of switchbacks up the final headwall to Crystal Lake. Crystal Lake is not conveniently walked along it’s shores; instead a pass north of the lake leads to a small tarn beneath Mineral Peak. The climb up to Mineral Peak is fairly straightforward with a mix of sand, talus and a short scramble that is mostly class 2 with a few class 3 moves depending on the exact route chosen. Aptly-named Mineral Peak is a relatively small mountain composed of several different colors of rock ranging from red to white. Owing to its centralized location, the view from the summit is fantastic and includes Sawtooth Peak rising steeply above Monarch Lake, Crystal Lake, the Mineral King Valley and the southern end of the Great Western Divide around Mount Florence. From Mineral Peak retrace steps down the scramble portion to the sandy slopes above the Crystal Lake tarn and then traverse slabs and sand to a broad pass above Amphitheater Lake. A few easy class 3 moves are found on either side of this pass. Take a moment at the pass to marvel at the striking curvature of the granite along the crest of the ridge. The descent to Ampitheater Lake is somewhat tricky as direct access to the lakeshore below is barred by steep and smooth granite slabs. Instead making a direct descent to the lake, traverse in a southerly direction along talus staying below cliffs of the crest and above the steep slabs descending to the lake. Eventually a small gully with grass patches and talus enables a descent down to the southwest corner of Ampitheater Lake.      Ampitheater is a somewhat common name in the Sierra and the Amphitheather Lake of Sawtooth Peak is not to be confused with the Ampitheater Lake which lies beneath Ampitheater Peak at the headwaters of Cataract Creek in Kings Canyon. What these two Ampitheater Lakes share in common is striking beauty and both are gems of the Sierra Nevada. As one would expect, there is definitely an amphitheater feeling with the rugged ridge from Needham Mountain to Sawtooth Peak and down to Peak 12,109 surrounding the lake. Rounding the south and east shores of Ampitheater Lake, one obtains a close up view of picturesque granite islands with such clear waters that one can easily see rocks at the lake bottom. From Ampitheater Lake pleasant slabs and meadows lead to the base of Needham Mountain. From here, Needham Mountain becomes a bit of a slog with some sandy slopes and loose rocks. Staying near the ridge crest on more solid rocks eliminates some of the slog but it’s not a very stimulating climb. The summit block is a somewhat nondescript with several different pinnacles vying for the highest point. What Needham lakes in climbing aesthetics it makes up with excellent 360 degree views including the Whitney Zone area, the Kaweah Peaks Ridge and the Great Western Divide. Moreover, the sandy slopes make for a enjoyable plunge step descent.To continue the loop to Sawtooth Peak, traverse sand and slabs and then climb talus slopes up to Sawtooth Peak, the most famous and most sought after summit in the region. Sawtooth has equally impressive views, particularly of the many lakes that surround its rocky slopes including Ampitheater Lake, Crystal Lake, the Monarch lakes to the south and the large Columbine Lake to the north. Mineral Peak takes on a particularly impressive profile from this angle. The Kaweah Peaks Ridge continue to play a star role in the view, as they do from virtually any high point in the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. From Sawtooth Peak I’ve found it’s best to descend below the crest of the ridge and take sandy use paths toward Sawtooth Pass. Unfortunately this sandy open terrain promotes a lot of braiding paths and even the designated trail is somewhat difficult to spot and stay on as there are so many different interconnecting paths.  The good news is one does not even need to find the Sawtooth Pass trail as the most efficient way down to Mineral King is directly down from Glacier Pass to Monarch Creek. The beginning of this descent is largely cross country but bits of old trail become more defined as one descends. At meadows ~9,600 ft, the old trail becomes much more defined as it traverses the final headwall down to the designated Sawtooth Peak Trail where the loop is complete and only a short bit of trail leads back down to the trailhead.   

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Eisen & Lippincott

Mount Eisen and Lippincott Mountain are two peaks along a remote stretch of the Great Western Divide between Black Rock Pass and Kaweah Gap. Both peaks are perfectly situated to provide jaw-dropping views of the Kaweah Peaks Ridge that dominate the view to the east. As Bob Burd showed in 2007, a fairly efficient traverse can be made between Eisen and Lipppincott enabling both peaks to be climbed in a long day from Mineral King. My last visit to Mineral King was way back in 2007 for a climb of Black Kaweah. I had been wanting to climb Eisen & Lippincott every since, but was deterred by the infamous Mineral King marmots that eat through hosing and have disabled cars from spring through August. I had pegged a late season visit when the marmots were gone, but each time other parts of the range called me elsewhere.

Nine years later, I was ready to drive the very curvy road up to Mineral King and climb Eisen & Lippincott. My route taken largely follows Bob’s 2007 trip. The only non-minor deviation was cutting over toward Eisen half way up the switchbacks to the Black Rock Pass. This allowed me to avoid some of the ridge traverse and extra elevation gain, likely saving a few minutes. The Kaweah Peaks Ridge commands attention for most of the day and this collection of rugged rocks is so inspiring that I easily took over 1,000 photos of it with my iPhone and dedicated camera. Despite culling the majority, there’s probably still way too many Kaweah photos posted here. The following day I did a very nice loop including Mineral Peak, Needham Mountain, Amphitheater Lake and Sawtooth Peak which I look forward to sharing on the blog soon. It took nine years between visits to Mineral King and I hope the next time will be much sooner!  Full photo albums: Camera; iPhone 

The route to reach Eisen & Lippincott begins in the charming Mineral King valley. After an initial climb on the Sawtooth Pass Trail, the most efficient route to Glacier Pass leaves the maintained trail at a small meadow and begins a traversing climb on an old unmaintainted trail. There’s some brush and some boulder hoping in sections, but the old path is followable all the way up to another meadow area above a headwall of Monarch Creek. The path disappears in this meadow, but veer left into a broad gully that leads toward Glacier Pass. On the left side of this broad gully the use path can be regained. With careful routefinding the use path can be followed most of the way to Glacier Pass.  Alternatively, one may stay on the maintained Sawtooth Pass Trail which reaches the Glacier Pass vicinity after a long series of gradual switchbacks, a circuitous trip to the lower Monarch Lakes and an annoyingly sandy climb. The correct crossing of Glacier Pass is slightly south and above the low point.

After passing over Glacier Pass, a use path descends to the gorgeous headwaters of Cliff Creek, one of the most enchanting places in the Sierra. The descent features picturesque small tarns and grizzled Southern Foxtail Pines with increasingly closer views of exquisite Spring Lake, which sports a spectacular blue color, particularly when contrasted with the red bark of the foxtail pines. Rising from Spring Lake’s shores is a impressive granite buttress which is the terminous of Sawtooth Peak’s north ridge. For Mount Eisen, follow Cliff Creek downstream from Spring Lake moving through a talus field and then easy meadows to join the Black Rock Pass trail. One may ascend the Black Rock Pass Trail all the way to the Pass or depart about halfway up the slope and angle toward Mount Eisen to save some time and extra elevation gain. Once the ridge is gained a false summit is reached with one of the most memorable views of the Kaweahs as Lake 10410 (one of the Little Five Lakes) is perfectly framed.  Some scrambling leads down to a pass between the false summit and Mount Eisen before the final scramble up Mount Eisen commences. Pursuing the summit register I learned that a ridge traverse from Eisen to Lippincott has been done in the past by staying right on the crest, but the easiest and most efficient route follows a route underneath the ridge.

From Eisen retreat back to the pass between Eisen and the false summit before picking one of many class 3 possibilities down the east side of the ridge to friendly granite slabs below. Traverse north to a gap along Eisen’s east ridge with a distinctive horn to the east of the gap and then descend a gully (likely containing snow) to a rockbound tarn. From here aim for a pass between the two unnamed peaks on the Great Western Divide that are between Eisen and Lippincott. There’s some slabs to descend followed by a large talus fields that leads to the pass. On the other side of this pass one is on the west side of the Great Western Divide and the traverse to Lippincott’s southeast ridge is fairly straightforward. It is recommended to loose some elevation to reach easier terrain versus remaining high. Lippincott’s southeast ridge is a fun class 3 scramble with lots of options to make it interesting on the ridge proper or tone down the difficulty by moving left off the ridge. Lippincott’s summit is a wonderful perch with views toward the Tablelands, Nine Lakes Basin and the Great Western Divide stretching to the north all the way to Mount Brewer and North Guard. The Kaweahs continue to command the greatest attention, particularly Black Kaweah and Red Kaweah, but with an added twist: at the base of Lippincott’s precipitous north face is an unnamed lake (“Lippincott Lake”) with a wonderful deep blue center ringed by a turquoise shoreline.

Some class 3 downclimbing is required on the upper part of the Lippincott’s east face, but it soons transitions into pleasant granite slabs. Following the drainage down leads to a wonderful parkland of Southern Foxtail Pines and small lakes. At the outlet of lake 10,295 curve to the south to reach the Big Arroyo Trail. The Big Arroyo Trail passes through one of the most pristine Southern Foxtail Pine woodlands in existence with some truly amazing trees. The scientific name for Southern Foxtail Pine is Pinus balfouriana subspecies austrina and it is endemic to the high country of the Southern Sierra Nevada. Most of the groves are within Sequoia National Park and the Big Arroyo and Upper Kern River watersheds contain the highest concentration of Southern Foxtail Pines anywhere. This fascinating tree occurs in nearly pure stands of widely spaced woodlands and the bark has a distinctive reddish color which is particularly striking in sunlight. The Foxtail Pine is slow growing and the arid, high-elevation conditions also mean it is slow to decay. Some living trees are thousands of years old and woody crowns can persist for much longer. In exposed places near tree line, numerous winter storms with high winds and ice sculpt and twist the trunk and branches into picturesque snags peeling away the bark to expose complex inner layers and striking colors. 

After some rolling hills through the Southern Foxtail Pine forest, the trail reaches Little Five Lakes with more great views of the Kaweahs. The shortest route back to Spring Lake and Glacier Pass is via an off trail traverse to Cyclamen Pass (point 11,145 on USGS). The east side of the pass is fairly straightforward with wonderful views down to the Big Five Lakes while the west side of the pass is a fairly arduous descent with sand in the upper part that transitions to talus below. Ultimately, one returns to beautiful Spring Lake where a use trail leads up to Glacier Pass. Here, the climbing is done for the day and it’s all downhill to Mineral King.   

Mount Stewart & Eagle Scout Peak

The Hamilton Lakes and Kaweah Gap region is one of the most dramatic and inspiring spots in the High Sierra. Considering how many times over the years I’ve visited the area it’s easily among my favorite spots to explore. I consider it one of the best spots for adventure running in the Sierra Nevada with a long runnable approach, fun scrambles and most importantly, jaw-dropping scenery. I’ve climbed most of the named summits in the region over the years, including Eagle Scout Peak and Mount Stewart on separate trips, but this time I would tag both summits together since they make logical sense as a pair. While it makes for a long day, both summits are class 2 scrambles and not very far apart. On this visit I paid particular attention to timing of best light for photography and made sure to be at the right place at the right time.  I spent several hours shooting photos and I hope the results reflect my efforts. On this post I’m introducing a new format for this blog – from now on I’m going to only post a few highlight photos from each adventure in the body of the post with a link to a full album on Google Photos where it’s easier to navigate through the larger set of photos and see full size versions. The complete photo album for this trip is hereTotal mileage for Eagle Scout and Mount Stewart was 50 miles, of which 40+ miles was out-and-back on the High Sierra Trail from Crescent Meadows to Kaweah Gap. The first 11 miles to Bearpaw Meadows is on well groomed trail with gentle ups and downs making it very runnable. Beyond Bearpaw Meadows the trail descends to cross Lone Pine Creek before ascending in a rocky stretch of trail to round a shoulder into the Hamilton Lakes drainage. After crossing Hamilton Creek the trail is in ascent mode all the way to Kaweah Gap but the incline is fairly moderate throughout. The Hamilton Lakes amphitheater is one of the most scenic areas in the High Sierra with towering granite faces of the Valhallas including the famous Angel Wings rock wall, Cherubim Dome, Hamilton Dome and many other sweet rock features. At the head of the amphitheater on opposite ends lies Mount Stewart and Eagle Scout Peak making them a perfect pair to tag on the same day. The area is so beautiful I haven’t figured out how to spot taking photos each time I visit, including nearly 200 photos when I did the complete High Sierra Trail for an FKT. From the beautiful sapphire blue waters of Upper Hamilton Lake the trail switchbacks before traversing to a spectacular view overlooking the lake and Angel Wings. The trail then reaches a picturesque tarn and then Precipice Lake.  At aptly-named Precipice Lake, the sheer cliffs of Eagle Scout Peak tumble right into the waters of the remarkably clear lake. This stunning view was immortalized by Ansel Adams in 1932 with his shot “Frozen Lake and Cliffs.” Shortly after Precipice Lake, one reaches Kaweah Gap which opens up a new world of scenery in the upper Big Arroyo River drainage including the Nine Lake Basin and the Kaweah Range. From Kaweah Gap, go south for Eagle Scout Peak and north for Mount Stewart. Both climbs are straightforward and offer different, but both marvelous, perspectives on the Hamilton Lakes and Nine Lakes Basin areas. The view of Precipice Lake from the summit of Eagle Scout Peak is particularly inspiring. The overhanging summit block of Eagle Scout Peak is indeed the precipice with the clear blue waters of Precipice Lake 2,000 feet below the sheer cliffs. Meanwhile, Mount Stewart offers an amazing view of Sabertooth Ridge, Tamarack Lake, and the rugged north side of Black Kaweah.  The complete photo album for this trip is here. 

Ericsson & Genevra

Mount Ericsson and Mount Genevra are two points along the rugged and immensely scenic Kings-Kern Divide which is a high barrier between the Kern River watershed and the Kings River watershed, two of the three important watersheds in the Southern High Sierra (the other being the Kaweah River). The point separating these three watersheds is aptly-named Triple Divide Peak along the Great Western Divide, which I visited last year. The Kings-Kern divide also serves to connect the Sierra Crest with the Great Western Divide and marks the border between Sequoia National Park and Kings Canyon National Park. Foerster Pass, the highest point along the Pacific Crest Trail at over 13,000 feet, is the only trail that crosses the Kings-Kern Divide, although there are a number of other cross country passes of varying difficulty. I have spent quite a bit of time in this area. In 2009 I did an aesthetic loop crossing through Milly’s Foot Pass to visit Upper Kern Basin and Lake Reflection for the first time. Last year, I climbed Mount Stanford, the highest point on the Kings-Kern Divide via Harrison Pass. On this trip I gained the divide via a little known route from Lake Reflection and then climbed Mount Ericsson. I then traversed the upper reaches of Kern Basin to Mount Genevra and descended Milly’s Foot Pass back to Lake Reflection, a jewel of the High Sierra. The route also included passage by lovely East Lake. GPS route here.While numerous cross country passes cross the Kings-Kern Divide, perhaps the second easiest route over the divide (after the Foerster Pass trail) is not a pass at all but a little known route over a high shoulder east of Lake Reflection, an unnamed point I like to call “Reflection Point”. This route takes an efficient class 2 avalanche chute all the way up and over the divide, lacking the unstable talus, scree and sand of the nearby passes, including Harrison Pass, Lucy’s Foot Pass, and Milly’s Foot Pass. More importantly, the Reflection Point route affords astounding views of Lake Reflection the Great Western Divide for its entire length. Mount Brewer and the Guards rise sharply above Lake Reflection with granite virtually everything in sight. A high shoulder marks the top of the chute where the climber is steps away from Reflection Point and a marvelous view that is better than most named summits. The south side of the pass is an easy descent into Kern Basin on gravel and meadows. The key to the Reflection Point route is finding the correct chute since more difficult terrain lies nearby and technical terrain is not much further.  Once in the chute, the terrain is mostly slabs all the way up (make sure to stay in the central wide chute) and goes as class 2 the entire way. On this day I used this route to access Mount Ericsson, centrally located on the Kings-Kern Divide with an excellent 360 degree view including the entire Sierra crest from the Palisades to Mount Whitney and the Great Western Divide from North Guard to Milestone Mountain. Once at the top of the route, it’s an easy stroll down to the top of Lucy’s Foot Pass with stunning views of the jagged Ericsson Crags.

At Lucy’s Foot Pass, you’re at the base of Mount Ericsson which goes as a class 2 talus slog with a little bit of class 3 at the top.  Mount Ericsson’s central location affords an amazing view of the entire southern Sierra. Ericsson’s most distinctive feature is its serpentine south ridge with numerous rocky ribs extending deep into Kern Basin. Of the sea of peaks surrounding Mount Ericsson, the closest and easiest is Mount Genevra across the upper reaches of Kern Basin. Mount Genevra also happens to be above Milly’s Foot Pass which provides passage through the Kings-Kern Divide back to Lake Reflection. Milly’s Foot Pass includes a sketchy 3rd class chute at the top where one must be cautious of kitty litter over the rocks, especially while descending. The remainder of the descent from Milly’s to Lake Reflection involves plenty of arduous talus, but there are some pretty alpine tarns midway down the descent. While Mount Genevra is much lower than Ericsson, its position provides very nice views to the Mount Whitney region and the Great Western Divide. My favorite angle was down the East Creek drainage including Mount Bago towering above East Lake. Perhaps the most endearing location on this route is Lake Reflection, one of the greatest gems in the Sierra. While I have visited Lake Reflection twice before, this was my first time for early morning light to see the exquisite reflections for which this lake is named. The early morning reflections did not disappoint and some new snow lining the cliffs of Mount Genevra and Mount Jordan only added to the tremendous setting. East Lake, located a couple miles before Lake Reflection, is also an excellent destination with beautiful views and reflections. It’s about 11 miles to Junction Meadow along the Bubbs Creek Trail. At the meadows, turn right onto the East Lake Trail which shortly crosses Bubbs Creek (can be hazardous in early season) and then begins and ascent to East Lake, reaching East Lake about 13.5 miles from Road’s End. After East Lake the trail becomes faint in spots manifesting the lack of visitation to this region, but the idea is to generally follow the watercourse upstream and in a couple miles the outlet of Lake Reflection is reached. At first glance, Lake Reflection might seem small, but this is only the outlet bay. A few meters away lies a log jam and views of the expansive alpine lake. GPS route here.

2013 Adventure Recap

2013 was an awesome year of adventures! From the coast to the High Sierra, there was a lot of everything. Browsing through my posts from this year really makes me appreciate living in California where it’s possible to enjoy a diverse set of adventures and occupy my desire to explore wild and rugged places year around.  This year was a little different in that I dealt with a major injury setback (Achilles and Soleus) in the Spring that required months of rehab and therapy. This precluded some of the more grand projects I had in mind, including FKT type aspirations. As the injury improved in the fall I was able to get out on some longer and faster outings which proved very memorable. Despite some frustrations with the injury I spent more time exploring the Sierra than in any prior year, which is very encouraging. This leaves me optimistic in thinking about what I can do if I’m healthy. I’ve already got many ideas for next year so the excitement level is high. Below is a complete list of this year’s adventures with a link to the blog post where I described that adventure in greater detail with many photos. Note: several adventures in the Ventana Wilderness along the Big Sur Coast occurred in late December 2013, but will be blogged in early 2014. I also envision putting together a list or online guide to my favorite Big Sur hikes and adventures.

  1. Glacier Point XC (December 31, 2012) 
  2. Dewey Point Snowshoe (January 1, 2013)
  3. Mount Silliman Snowshoe (January 19, 2013)
  4. Winter Alta & Moose Lake Snowshoe (January 20, 2013)
  5. Buena Vista Peak, Horse Ridge & Ostrander Snowshoe (February 10, 2013)
  6. Prairie Creek Redwoods (February 16-18, 2013)
  7. Jedediah Smith Redwoods (February 17, 2013)
  8. Point Reyes 27 mile loop (March 23, 2013)
  9. Pinnacles National Park (April 6, 2013)
  10. Doud Peak & Rocky Ridge (April 13, 2013)
  11. Post Summit & East Molera Ridge (April 14, 2013)
  12. Cone Peak via Stone Ridge Direct (April 20, 2013)
  13. Yosemite North Rim Tour (April 27, 2013)
  14. Clouds Rest via Yosemite Valley (April 28, 2013)
  15. Doud Peak & Rocky Ridge (May 11, 2013)
  16. Pico Blanco via Little Sur (May 12, 2013)
  17. Tenaya Rim Loop (May 19, 2013)
  18. Cherry Creek Canyon (May 25, 2013)
  19. Smith Peak (May 26, 2013)
  20. High Sierra Camps Loop (June 1, 2013)
  21. Tuolumne Explorations (June 2, 2013)
  22. Rodgers Peak (June 15, 2013)
  23. Sky Haven & Cloudripper (June 16, 2013)
  24. Volcanic Ridge and Minarets Loop (June 22, 2013)
  25. Mount Starr and Little Lakes Valley (June 23, 2013)
  26. Reinstein & Godard Fastpacking (June 29-30, 2013)
  27. Mount Florence (July 5, 2013)
  28. Onion Valley to South Lake (July 6, 2013)
  29. Mount Hoffman (July 7, 2013)
  30. Tapto Lakes (July 19-21, 2013)
  31. Desolation Seven Summits (July 28, 2013)
  32. Pinnacles National Park (August 4, 2013)
  33. Red Slate Mountain (August 10, 2013)
  34. Sawtooth Loop: Matterhorn Peak, Finger Peaks, Kettle Peak (August 11, 2013)
  35. Mount Stanford & Kings-Kern Loop (August 24, 2013)
  36. Mount Shasta via Clear Creek (August 31, 2013)
  37. Trinity Alps Traverse: Mount Hilton, Wedding Cake, Thompson Peak (September 1, 2013)
  38. Caribou Lakes (September 2, 2013)
  39. Lion Loop: Lion Rock & Triple Divide Peak (September 8, 2013)
  40. Kaweah Queen, Lawson Peak & Kaweah Gap (September 15, 2013)
  41. Whitney to Langley via Miter Basin (September 28, 2013)
  42. Tulainyo Lake: Cleaver Peak and Mount Carillon (September 29, 2013)
  43. Robinson Peak (October 5, 2013)
  44. Little Lakes Valley (October 5, 2013)
  45. Mount Winchell & Mount Robinson (October 6, 2013)
  46. Andrew Molera (October 13, 2013)
  47. Foerster Peak (October 19, 2013)
  48. Tuolumne to Devils Postpile via Minarets and Donohue Peak (October 22, 2013)
  49. Monarch Divide Semi-Loop: Kennedy Mountain, Munger Peak, Goat Mountain (October 27, 2013)
  50. Cone Peak Marathon (November 3, 2013)
  51. Clouds Rest & Yosemite’s South Rim (November 9, 2013)
  52. Point Reyes South District Loop (November 24, 2013)
  53. Junipero Serra Peak (December 8, 2013)
  54. Cone Peak via Stone Ridge and North Coast Trail (December 15, 2013)
  55. Boronda/De Angulo Loop (December 21, 2013)
  56. Partington Cove to McWay Falls (December 22, 2013) 
  57. Sierra Hill at Brazil Ranch (December 22, 2013)
  58. Ventana Double Cone (December 24, 2013) 
  59. Limekiln to Big Sur via the Coast Ridge (December 28, 2013) 
  60. Prewitt Ridge (December 29, 2013)

“Lion Loop” – Lion Rock and Triple Divide Peak

The “Lion Loop” is a spectacular large loop that I designed out of Wolverton utilizing the High Sierra Trail and the Tablelands to access one of the most remote corners of the High Sierra along the Great Western Divide. Lion Lake is the centerpiece feature of the route and is absolutely stunning with Triple Divide Peak and Lion Rock creating an impressive background against its azure waters. The entire region is highly scenic with a rugged and wild feeling that is among the finest in all of the High Sierra.  Strava route here.

I started at 3:25 a.m. and had about 2.5 hours of nighttime running through Bearpaw meadows. Continuing to Tamarack Lake I gazed up at the impressive granite domes and faces lining the canyon. Beyond Tamarack Lake, I made my way efficiently up granite slabs and benches until the last 500 vertical to the summit of Lion Rock. There is some loose rock in this final scramble section and the class 3 route was not immediately obvious, but not hidden either and I soon found myself at the summit enjoying a magnificent view in all directions, but the favorite angle was down to Lion Lake glistening in the early morning sunlight framed by the triangular-shaped Triple Divide Peak. From the summit of Lion Rock I decided to attempt descending the northeast chute. At first the downclimbing was easy but then I reached a crux portion – the final few feet to get into the chute proper was pretty smooth granite with few features. I’m not a rock climber so I was not comfortable with most of the options until I found a solution across the face and into the chute that I could manage. It was probably low 5th class. There might have been a third class access point somewhere, but I didn’t find it and I’m thinking access is much easier when the chute is filled with snow. After gently lowering myself through the remainder of the extremely loose and steep chute, travel was surprisingly straightforward and efficient to Lion Lake where I enjoyed the stupendous views of the lake and surroundings every step of the way. 

Rounding my way around Lion Lake, I then went up to Lion Lake Pass. From the pass, I went around a buttress to beautiful Glacier Lake. The lake is tucked in under an impressive rock face and reminds me of Precipice Lake along the High Sierra Trail. The view from the lake down Cloud Canyon and the Whaleback are equally impressive. From Glacier Lake, I took a loose chute up Triple Divide’s north face with some fun class 3 scrambling in the upper reaches. Triple Divide Peak is aptly named as it divides the three primary river drainages of the Southern Sierra: the Kings, Kern and Kaweah.  From Triple Divide I returned back to Glacier Lake and just below Lion Lake Pass before traversing toward Copper Mine Pass. Instead of going to the pass I ascended the peak at the head of basin dividing Cloud Canyon and Deadman Canyon – “Copper Mine Peak.” This peak featured more amazing views down both of these canyons. From the summit of Copper Mine Peak an old use trail heads west to a saddle for easy access into Deadman Basin. In this area I passed by some rusty, old and rudimentary mining artifacts. The trek across Deadman Basin to Horn Col was spectacular with gorgeous views down Deadman canyon. From Horn Col, I traversed across the basin to Pterodactyl Pass and then rounded Big Bird Peak’s shoulder to the Tablelands. Descending the Tablelands through the Marble Fork of the Kaweah River was fast I was soon at the Pear Lake backcountry ranger outpost and on the maintained trail. From here it was a fairly quick jog over the last 6 miles back to Wolverton for a 15h42m minute day. Strava route here.

Winter Alta & Moose Lake Snowshoe

I had a great memories of a climb of Winter Alta in 2011 so I was excited to come back and this time I ventured further to remote Moose Lake (see route on Strava here).  The view from Winter Alta is simply outstanding. Overlooking Moose Lake and the Great Western Divide, it seems as if the entire range is at your feet.  At around 10,500 feet in elevation, Moose Lake is one of the largest high alpine lakes in the region. Nestled in a shallow bench, the lake is well above tree line which provides an unobstructed view of a large portion of the Great Western Divide and Black Kaweah.  The panorama of Moose Lake and all the peaks in the background is one of the greatest in all of the High Sierra. Complete photo album here.

This area is accessed via the Pear Lake ski hut and a marked winter trail from Wolverton.  The path from Wolverton to the ski hut is challenging for a snowshoe hike with lots of elevation gain but well worth the efforts. The slopes near the hut are fairly popular with backcountry skiers, but I found few tracks beyond a couple hundred feet above the hut and no tracks beyond Winter Alta.  Prior to summiting Winter Alta, I decided to continue further along the Tablelands to Moose Lake. The lake is about 850 feet below 11,328 foot Winter Alta which apparently deters most people from visiting. The snow conditions on this day oscillated between a stable crust and deep powder, but overall not bad for efficient progress. I made my way down some moderately sleep slopes and soon found myself walking across the tundra that is a frozen Moose Lake. I crossed the lake at its center and my poles hit a solid ice platform about a foot and half underneath the top of the powder. From the far end of the lake, I admired the view down the Middle Fork of the Kaweah River, the Kaweah Gap area, and the line of peaks that stretched as far as the eye could see.

I recrossed the lake at a different point and headed up for the summit of Winter Alta taking many photos and video clips along the way. Calm conditions on the summit provided an incentive to stick around and enjoy the scenery for a bit. Once I packed up, the descent went fast and I decided to come down through Pear Lake. After some moderately steep (but soft) slopes, I was on top of frozen Pear Lake, which is located in a rugged granite cirque beneath the Alta Peak massif.  After some more photography and video, I headed down the slopes to the Pear Lake ski hut and started my return to Wolverton.  This proved to be another fantastic snowshoe outing in Sequoia National Park!  I look forward to coming back and exploring further along the Tablelands in the winter, perhaps all the way to Big Bird Peak for views down to Big Bird lake and closer views of the Great Western Divide.