Andrew Molera State Park

Andrew Molera State Park has some fantastic trail running and scnery. In the spring I did a hike up East Molera Ridge to Post Summit. The East Molera Ridge route has spectacular views with a gorgeous display of wildflowers and green grass in the spring. A use path continues beyond Post Summit along Cabezo Prieto to Mount Manuel and Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park, a loop that I look forward to completing soon.  On this day I explored the trails on the west side of Hwy 1 with Erica where a great loop can be designed including Ridge Trail, Panorama Trail and Bluffs Trail. I did this loop back in 2009 so it’s been awhile. This route has classic Big Sur coastal scenery with steep hillsides plunging into the turquoise waters of the Pacific Ocean including rugged sea stacks and hidden beaches. While there trails are largely in exposed coastal scrub and chaparral, there are sections of beautiful oak woodland even some patches of pretty redwoods.

The run started out foggy along the coast but as we descended the Panorama Trail, the fog retreated from the coast dramatically revealing the amazing coastal scenery.  The trails in Andrew Molera State Park are very runnable and moderate in elevation gain, especially when compared with most other trails in the Big Sur region. On this run we also checked out the Headlands Trail to Point Molera which is an awesome viewpoint including the Pico Blanco towering above. The great view from this promontory was an unexpected surprise which made it all the more sweeter. There was a group of guided horseback riders on the beach across the lagoon that produced a particularly photogenic scene. For history buffs, there is a very old cabin on the way to the Point Molera known as the Cooper Cabin. Strava Route here

Point Reyes South District Loop

[Summary from my April 2013 post] A spectacular meeting of land and ocean, Point Reyes National Seashore is one of my favorite places anywhere.  Point Reyes has incredible variety from rugged beaches to waterfalls to lush forests. With nearly 150 miles of trails  to explore, there always seems to be something new to experience on each visit.  Most of the trail miles are within the Phillip Burton Wilderness, the only federally designated wilderness along California’s coast aside from the King Range Wilderness at Humboldt County’s Lost Coast. Covering 33,373 acres of wilderness and “potential’ wilderness, the road-less land encompasses nearly half of the total 71,070 acres of Point Reyes. 

On this day Erica and I set out from Bear Valley on a 24 mile lollipop loop of the southern portion of Point Reyes. Along the way we had great variety from the fir forests on Greenpicker Trail, Lake Ranch Trail and Ridge Trail to the coastal scenery of Alamere Falls, Wildcat Beach and Arch Rock. It was great to check out some trails I had never seen in the interior part of Point Reyes and revisit some familiar scenes along the coast in different lighting and tidal conditions. Trails in the interior of southern Point Reyes are heavily wooded and solitude can be found with few visitors. The coastal scenery was beautiful as usual and the photo above shows late afternoon sunlight coming underneath Arch Rock, providing a twist on this extremely photogenic scene that I have captured numerous times. Other photos from this loop are located below. There are so many awesome trails in Point Reyes the options for designing aesthetic routes for long runs is virtually limitless. I imagine it won’t be long before I’m back at the Seashore.  Strava route here.

A selection of photo albums and reports from past trips to Point Reyes:

 

Ohlone Bluffs at Wilder Ranch

The Ohlone Bluffs trail in Wilder Ranch State Park provides access to a gorgeous stretch of coastline just outside of Santa Cruz along Highway 1. The bluffs feature unique sandstone terraces sculpted by powerful ocean forces and sandy beaches. From the park headquarters, the trail stretches around 6.5 miles to the other end of the park, although a mile can be cut at lower tides with a direct crossing of Sand Plant Beach. The trail begins wide and well-trodden but progressively narrows and becomes grassy as you progress away from the park headquarters toward four mile beach. The sections toward Four Mile Beach can become muddy after rains.

Numerous beaches are visible along the way including Wilder Ranch Beach, Strawberry Beach, Sand Plant Beach, Three Mile Beach, and Four Mile Beach.  Great vistas abound at virtually every corner and there are many opportunities for exploration of the terraces and rock formations on the beaches.  Moreover, as an essentially flat trail, you don’t have to work very hard for the views! The Ohlone Bluffs trail is far from a wilderness experience with Hwy 1 nearby and agriculture coming right up to the bluffs, but the intricate coastline and rugged coastal scenery make this a great destination. Here are some photos from a recent run of the Ohlone Bluffs Trail.