Four Lakes Loop

The easternmost part of the Trinity Alps is informally known as the Red Trinities due to the distinctive red rock present in this region. However, within the red rock is a section of white granite that is akin to the White Trinities to the west. This white rock stretches from Granite Lake to Gibson Peak to Siligo Peak, and not surprisingly, this area of white rock is also the most rugged part of this region. The transition between the red and white rock is very well defined creating a fantastic juxtaposition. The Four Lakes Loop is located in the heart of the Red Trinities and offers a particularly striking tour of this geologically complex region. The loop is essentially a circumnavigation of Siligo Peak passing by four alpine lakes that surround the mountain. The loop itself is only around 6.5 miles but the entire loop is deep within the Trinity Alps Wilderness and access to the loop is through one of five trails. The shortest and most efficient is the Long Canyon Trail at 6 miles (18+ miles total for the loop and access), but other options include the Stoney Ridge Trail, Granite Lake Trail via Swift Creek, Deer Creek Trail via Stuark Fork Trinity River, and Bear Basin. The land is not as rugged as the neighboring White Trinities, but it has a unique and charming character that is spectacular in its own right. The Four Lakes Loop is a wonderful introduction to the region and has new and spectacular scenery around seemingly every corner.

The author accessed the Four Lakes Loop via the Long Canyon Trail so the following is a description of that route.  The Long Canyon Trail is a steady climb through conifer forest before emerging into meadows beneath striking Gibson Peak. It is here where one may encounter fields of Anemone occidentalis, or the western pasqueflower.  The pasqueflower produces a fruit called an achene that is ellipsoid in shape and feather-like. This furry fruit reminds people of the truffula trees in Dr. Seuss’s The Lorax. The flower and its whimsical late summer fruit can be found in open rocky slopes and alpine meadows in the trinity alps and one of the best places is the meadows in upper Long Canyon and the slopes above Deer Lake. The meadows continue all the way to Bee Tree Gap, where one obtains a view of Siligo Meadows and the spires along Gibson Peak’s west ridge. After about a mile traverse above Siligo Meadows one arrives at Deer Creek Pass and is treated to a wonderful view of Deer Creek and the glacier carved U-shaped valley of Deer Creek. Here the striking juxtaposition of red and white rocks becomes apparent as red rocks fill the basin around Deer Lake but Siligo Peak possesses a distinctively white summit area.

A switchback beneath Deer Creek Pass is the junction with the Four Lakes Loop. Doing the loop clockwise, one makes a lovely traverse through the red rocks above Deer Lake and up some switchbacks to the south shoulder of Siligo Peak. The trail passes through wonderful meadows stretching down to Deer Lake and including more pasqueflower. At the shoulder of Siligo Peak a use trail departs up the ridge to 8,162 ft Siligo Peak. In only a quarter mile the trail reaches the summit which contains a gorgeous 360 degree panorama of the region. To the west one has a birds eye view of Diamond Lake, the Stuart Fork of the Trinity River canyon, and the White Trinities. All of the major peaks of the White Trinities are visible including Mount Hilton, Thompson Peak, Caesar Peak and Caribou Mountain. Closest and most prominent is Sawtooth Mountain with its distinctive tooth-like summit block and a massive apron of white granite slabs on its east side. To the south is Summit Lake, Red Mountain and Middle Peak. To the east is a striking demarcation between the red rocks of Seven Up Peak and the rugged ridge known as Dolomite Ridge composed of the white rocks. To the north one peers into the glacier-carved Deer Creek canyon with Mount Shasta’s distinctive snow-capped cone rising above the ridges. Suffice it to say, the side trip to Siligo Peak is well worth the extra effort.

Back on the Four Lakes Loop one may make a side trip to Summit Lake which is the largest of the four lakes on the Four Lakes Loop. Continuing on, the loop drops into the Salt Creek drainage and switchbacks down toward Diamond Lake, which sits on a meadowy bench with the White Trinities towering across the Stuart Fork Canyon. This is lovely country with bountiful summertime wildflowers and outstanding scenery. From Diamond Lake it’s a gradual climb up to the northwest shoulder of Siligo Peak where one crosses into the Deer Creek drainage. From here the trail traverses above astonishingly beautiful Luella Lake which sits right at the line between red and white rock with Seven Up Peak and Dolomite Ridge making a dramatic background. Colorful Luella Lake sits at the base of the north face of Siligo Peak which contains mountain hemlocks and rugged cliffs. This steep north-facing topography enables snow to collect around Luella Lake and persist into late summer and sometimes year around. Beneath Luella Lake the trail descends into a valley in the upper reaches of Deer Creek Canyon. At the valley floor is the junction with the trail that goes down Deer Creek Canyon, which also provides access the route from Granite Lake and Swift Creek. Staying right to stay on the Four Lakes Loop, the trail makes a steep ascent up the headwall of Deer Creek through meadows and clumps of Mountain Hemlock to Deer Lake. The imposing cliffs of Dolomite Ridge dominate the view are along this section. From Deer Lake there’s one final climb to complete the loop and then reach Deer Creek Pass before a mainly flat traverse back to Bee Tree Gap and virtually all downhill through Long Canyon back to the trailhead. Total mileage of the Four Lakes Loop via Long Canyon is around 18 miles. 

The area has numerous opportunities for exploration and one option is the following tour of three additional off-trail lakes that connects back to the Long Canyon trail. Instead of returning back to Deer Creek Gap, one may take the trail down to Siligo Meadows and then up to Little Stonewall Pass. Just beyond Little Stonewall Pass a usetrail branches out to Echo Lake, one of the more charming lakes in the region. Circle Echo Lake on either side and then ascend a chute with some loose rocks (off-trail) to a col on the crest. Descend talus and then traverse slopes north to Billy Be Damned Lake. From Billy Be Damn Lake it’s a short climb up and over to the magnificent Anna Lake, situated in a bowl of red granite slabs and mountain hemlock. From Anna Lake a faint use trail heads down a steep gully down to Long Canyon. The use trail ultimately disappears in the meadows, but the Long Canyon trail is visible below and the way is unambiguous. GPS route here.

Photo albums: Camera; iPhone 

Sierra Adventures Update

It’s been two months since I last blogged but it’s not because I haven’t been busy. Between a hectic workweek in the Bay Area and weekends filled driving to and adventuring in the Sierra I haven’t had a chance to blog. This post will serve as a summary of recent trips with links to full iphone photo albums. I might blog on some of these adventures in the future. I actually brought my dedicated camera on all these trips and took just as many photos with the camera (if not more) but haven’t had a chance to go through the thousands (literally) of photos yet so all photos in the albums and below are from the iPhone. The good news is the iPhone photo quality has improved to the point that resolution is satisfactory for mobile device or computer screen viewing and it’s just so much easier for me to get photos up quickly (images below are lower resolution; ask me if interested in higher resolution). By using both the iPhone and a dedicated camera this also meant that I spent twice as much time doing photography as I used to, which was already a lot!

  1. Tablelands, Big Bird Peak, Alta Peak (June 18th)An early season trip across the Tablelands to Big Bird Peak which has a fantastic view of the Great Western Divide, the Valhalla, and Big Bird Lake. On the way back I stopped by the gorgeous Moose Lake which still had some floating icebergs and continued up and over the Alta Peak massif.
  2. Monarch Divide and Granite Lake (June 19th): A hike up to Granite Basin, Granite Pass and up the Monarch Divide to a balcony overlooking Granite Lake on one side and Volcanic Lakes basin on the other.
  3. Mammoth to North Lake (June 25-26th): A two day fastpack from Mammoth Lakes to North Lake via the Sierra High Route including Mammoth Crest, Shout of Relief Pass, Bighorn Pass, Gabbot Pass, White Bear Pass, Feather Pass and Puppet Pass. The trip also included a climb of Feather Peak, my second time on this outstanding summit.
  4. North Fork Big Pine (July 2nd): A trip with Erica up the North Fork Big Pine to the foot of the Palisade Glacier including stops at first, second and third lakes and Sam Mack Meadows. The turquoise waters of Second Lake are some of the most beautiful in the Sierra.
  5. SHR Ansel Adams (July 3rd): A tour of the Sierra High Route from Devils Postpile to Thousand Island Lake and back to Agnew Meadows via the River Trail. The trio of lakes beneath the Minarets are always a favorite spot to visit!
  6. SHR Headwaters (July 4th): From Agnew Meadows to Tuolumne Meadows the long way up and over North Glacier Pass and into the stunning cirque beneath Mount Ritter that forms the headwaters of the North Fork San Joaquin River. The route passes by beautiful Twin Island Lakes and Blue Lake on the way to Blue Lake Pass. Unfortunately the back half of the route on the Isberg Pass and Rafferty Creek Trails to Tuolumne Meadows is a relatively mundane stretch of many miles.
  7. Mount Farquhar (July 9th): A jaunt up Sphinx Creek to a mountain that has always piqued my interest when passing by. The scramble route up the main gully to the summit is super fun and the afternoon views of the impressive north face of North Guard Peak are even better.
  8. Deerhorn Mountain (July 10th): Another mountain that has always drawn interest, particularly from the vicinity of Bullfrog Lake and Mount Rixford. Deerhorn is a beautiful mountain and I found the scramble to be enjoyable. The views from the top are tremendous as the mountain is centrally located for an excellent vantage of the Kings-Kern Divide and Great Western Divide. I also really enjoyed the Vidette Lakes.
  9. Evolution-Ionian Loop (July 16-18th): A 2.5 day tour through the Evolution and Ionian Regions including summits of Muriel, Goethe, Spencer, McGee, Hansen, Scylla and Solomons.
    • Route:   
    • Day 1 Photo Album: Late start at 1:30 pm from Sabrina but still time for Muriel and Goethe on the first day. Muriel might be lower than surrounding peaks but it has a great view of Mount Darwin and Mendel. The traverse from Muriel to Goethe is a fun bit of scrambling and evening light descending the slopes of Goethe to Darwin Bench was amazing.
    • Day 2 Photo Album: Day 2 started at Darwin Bench with a field of lupine and a great reflection. The summit of Mount Spencer is well worth the ~1500 ft climb from Sapphire Lake (JMT) with a wonderful 360 degree view of Evolution Basin owing to its centralized location. The afternoon destination was Mount McGee which has piqued my interest each time I’ve been in the region. The route up McGee included passage through the lovely Davis Lakes, which turned out to be the biggest surprise of the trip in terms of exceeding expectations. The uppermost Davis Lake has mineral sedimentation creating a wonderful turquoise color but the real treat was the lowest Davis Lake which takes on the appearance of a fjord as at twists and turns between rocky buttress. The climb of Mount McGee is a bit of a grind but the view from the summit is one of the best I’ve seen with an aerial view looking down at the Davis Lakes immediately below with the Goddard Divide creating a rugged background. After enjoying the Davis Lakes one more time I took Starr’s route over the Goddard Divide and had lovely evening views from the crest of the divide before descending into Ionian Basin for the night.
    • Day 3 Photo Album: The day started with wonderful views from Scylla and Hansen and then a beautiful walk through the Ionian Basin to Mount Solomons. Solomons provides a great vantage of Charybdis and the Sierra Crest in the vicinity of Muir Pass. From Solomons I went directly down to Muir Pass (staying off steep snow since I had no traction device) and then up to Echo Col for more great views of lake 11428 and Black Giant. The end of the route took me through Sabrina Basin.
  10. Rodgers Peak (July 23rd):  The afternoon views from Rodgers Peak were swell, but the wildflower meadows on the way down (above Rodgers Lake) were stunning; possibly the best display I’ve seen in the Sierra. Having summited Rodgers Peak a couple years ago, I knew the best light would be in the afternoon so I got a late start from the Rush Creek trailhead (after the 5 hour drive from the Bay Area) and almost suffocated from the heat before even arriving at Gem Lake! Rodgers Peak provides outstanding views since it sits a triple point of the Ritter Range, Cathedral Range and the ridge trending SW to Electra and Foerster that separates the Merced and San Joaquin drainages.
  11. Echo Peaks (July 24th): A short trip up from Tuolumne Meadows but high rewards with excellent vistas of Cathedral Peak, Matthes Crest, Mount Lyell, Mount Maclure, Mount Florence and the Clark Range. To the north we could see Mount Conness, Matterhorn Peak, Tower Peak and a myriad of other peaks and domes in northern Yosemite.

Stone Ridge & Aerial Falls

Cone Peak rises 5,155 ft above the Pacific Ocean in less than three miles as the crow flies, making it one of the steepest gradients from ocean to summit in the contiguous United States. It’s nearly a vertical mile above the glimmering ocean with a commanding view of the Big Sur Coast. Such steep topography leads to many awesome features, not the least of which is waterfalls! On this day I visited an ephemeral waterfall on the backside of Cone Peak in the headwaters of the San Antonio River, my first adventure into the San Antonio watershed. This falls only flows with any kind of noticeable volume after a period of substantial winter rainfall so on all my times standing on Cone Peak I never noticed the falls. However, when in flow the falls is striking from the summit particularly in the afternoon sunlight. Technically the falls does not drain Cone Peak itself, but from the summit one can gain a great birds eye view of the main 100+ ft drop across the canyon. I named the falls “Aerial Falls” because of the aerial style of the view from Cone Peak and also when standing beneath the falls it seems as if the water is falling from the sky as it plunges off the massive conglomerate rock facade. Beneath the main drop is a series of additional falls and cascades so the total height of the falls from top to bottom likely approaches 200 vertical feet. In order to view the falls from its base one must earn it: first in terms of timing to see the falls in flow (which is admittedly rare) and second in the arduous off-trail adventure down into the depths of the remote, trail-less headwaters of the San Antonio River (it’s farther than it seems).


The most prominent ridge on the Cone Peak massif (which includes Twin Peak) is Stone Ridge. The direct route up this ridge is tremendous and worthy of the title “Sea to Sky.” Stone Ridge is easily the most impressive and prominent ridge along the entire Big Sur Coast. While there are a bevy of beautiful grassy ridges near the ocean that I have explored (Boronda, Prewitt, Shouey, East Molera, Kirk Creek, Mount Mars to name a few), each with its own charm and inspiration, none compare to Stone Ridge in terms of height (4,800 ft), length (4 miles) and sheer topography in all directions. In 5.25 miles, one can go from the Pacific Ocean to the 5,155 ft summit of Cone Peak, the King of the Big Sur Coast.  Suffice it to say, Stone Ridge is one-of-a-kind. I’ve blogged about Stone Ridge and the “Sea to Sky” route many times before so there really isn’t anything to add except some photos from the latest trip. 

Little Big Loop – Santa Lucia Wilderness

The Santa Lucia Wilderness is a little-known 20,412 acre wilderness at the southern end of the Santa Lucia Range near San Luis Obispo. Only a few trails traverse the relatively small wilderness, including Lopez Canyon Trail, Big Falls Trail and Little Falls Trail. The Little Falls and Big Falls Trails can be connected using dirt roads to form an attractive loop. The dirt road on the ridge is a fire road (closed to vehicles) with stellar views of the surrounding ridges while the dirt road at the bottom is the access road for a surprising number of homeowners holed up in lower Lopez Canyon. While the road in Lopez Canyon is publicly accessible, high clearance is required, especially if there is any kind of flow in the waterfalls since the road crosses Lopez Creek many times (and often quite deep). There is therefore little vehicle traffic on the road. For most folks it makes much more sense to park on the other side of the ridge at Rinconada Trailhead.  From Rinconada, a great 13+ mile lasso loop includes the Big Falls and Little Falls Trails which feature three waterfalls, excellent views of the surrounding mountains and great diversity of flora. Moreover, the out-and-back trail from Rinconada to the ridge is not very long (~1.5 miles) and enjoyable in its own right.    

My last visit to this area was in autumn when the falls were mostly dry so it was a completely different experience with the falls and streams gushing at high flow after recent heavy rain. The centerpiece waterfall feature is Big Falls at around 80 ft in height with a beautiful rock amphitheater surrounding the falls. Lower down the Big Falls Trail is a smaller “slide” falls that plunges into a deep pool that makes for a lovely swimming and diving hole on warm summer days. The third falls is “Little Falls”  which is about half the height of Big Falls but has very charming setting and pretty plunge pool. Little Falls is not visible from the Little Falls Trail; instead one must take a usepath that departs the main trail at the last crossing of Little Falls Creek before it embarks on a lengthy ascent up the Little Falls canyon. If there is flow in the creeks expect dozens of creek crossings, both on the trails and the Lopez Canyon road with guaranteed wet feet.

Silver Peak Traverse

Silver Peak rises steeply from the south coast of Big Sur to a lofty perch at 3,590 ft. The summit sits at the center of the 31,555 acre namesake Silver Peak Wilderness, which encompasses some of the most spectacular terrain and scenery in all of Big Sur. Silver Peak is a broad massif with relatively gradual topography at its uppermost elevations becoming progressively steeper as one descends toward the canyons of Salmon Creek and Villa Creek. One of my favorite aspects of the Silver Peak Wilderness is the amazing biological diversity. The upper elevations are generally a mix of chaparral, Gray Pine and Coulter Pine. The eastern end of the Silver Peak massif includes a rare grove of Sargent Cypress. Middle elevations, especially in riparian corridors, tend to feature oak woodland and bay laurel trees. The upper Villa Creek Canyon includes a rare grove of Santa Lucia Firs and the middle and lower sections of Villa Creek Canyon feature one of the southernmost stands of old growth redwood. Meanwhile, Salmon Creek Canyon has a nice stand of Douglas Fir.  Silver Peak stands apart from the south coast ridge crest so the 360 degree panorama from its summit is tremendous. To the north is an excellent view of Cone Peak, Twin Peak and Junipero Serra. Close at hand is San Martin Top, Alder Peak and Lion Peak. To the south is a commanding view of the Dutra Flats area, Mount Mars, County Line Ridge, Bald Top, Piedras Blancas and the mountains of Hearst Ranch in San Luis Obispo County. The steep topographical relief results in immense orographic enhancement of precipitation in winter storms. This results in a number of impressive waterfalls and beautiful streams flowing over bedrock that drain Silver Peak. The Silver Peak Wilderness includes a lovely network of trails. A loop around Silver Peak can be made utilizing the Cruickshank, Salmon Creek and Buckeye Trails and is a wonderful way to enjoy the many facets of this wilderness, but it does not reach the summit of Silver Peak. In order to reach the summit of Silver Peak, a use path on a narrowed old fire road starts at the divide between Villa Creek and Salmon Creek along the Cruickshank Trail. The old fire road has narrowed to single track in spots as it passes thorugh Sargent Cypress, a stand of Coulter Pines and chaparral. The old fire road passes within a few feet of the summit, at which point a short path cuts through the brush to the summit rocks, which includes a summit register. One may continue along the old fireroad west of the summit to complete the traverse of the Silver Peak massif. The old fire road terminates near Silver Peak usecamp. From the Silver Peak usecamp, “Soda Wildtrail” cuts through the chaparral to prominent point 2,866 (aka “Soda Peak”) which sits near the headwaters of Soda Gulch. “Soda Peak” has one of the best views of the south Big Sur coastline looking south to Piedras Blancas and Mount Mars. The final portion of the Silver Peak traverse continues down from Soda Peak toward the Buckeye Trail and features lovely meadows interspersed with pines and oak trees with spectacular vistas the entire way.  

The Lost Grove

I’ve written in great detail about Santa Lucia Firs recently so I won’t repeat myself and describe the awesomeness of this tree again. The highest concentration of Santa Lucias (by far) is in the Carmel River drainage where the rocky, rugged terrain provides an ideal fire-proof habitat for the trees to thrive. The second greatest concentration stretches from Devils Canyon up to Cone Peak, also very rugged and rocky. South of Cone Peak there are only a few isolated groves in existence, perhaps fewer than a half dozen, making each of these groves especially unique. The most accessible of these groves is located in the upper part of Villa Creek in the Silver Peak Wilderness. The Cruickshank Trail passes among the firs with good views into the canyon bottom where the firs are highly concentrated.  As I’m a Santa Lucia Fir aficionado, I decided to visit a more remote stand that has piqued my interest ever since I saw the familiar narrow conical crowns of the Santa Lucia Firs from a nearby ridge. Since the grove is tucked away in a hanging valley with no easy access I decided to name it the Lost Grove. Unlike the larger stands in the Carmel River drainage and Cone Peak, the growing habitat in the Lost Grove is restricted to a narrow mile-long strip along a rocky stream.  The vast majority of the trees reside on the cooler northeast facing slope and the density of firs is some of the greatest I have seen; it’s almost as if the trees are huddling together to keep cool. There is a sharp gradient between the Santa Lucia Firs and the hot chaparral slopes with only a few Coulter and gray pines mixed in. It appears destructive fire has largely avoided this grove for many years and the result is some amazing old growth trees with impressively tall spire-like crowns that epitomize the Santa Lucia Fir. A few of the firs appeared drought stressed or have already succumbed to drought so hopefully this winter’s rain will be sufficient to help these trees survive the next summer. This grove resides in a relatively hotter and drier location than most Santa Lucias so it did not come as a surprise that the effects of the drought were visible, but the vast majority of trees still appeared healthy and there were hundreds of new saplings on the shady forest floor poised to become the next generation. I also suspect that the lifespan of the Santa Lucia Fir is not all the great as every grove I have visited includes several old snags. Access to the grove entails either a moderately brushy approach from a nearby ridge with excellent views to the Pacific Ocean or a creek walk with an extended stretch of beautiful bedrock and boulder cascades. 

Ventana Cone & Lion Rock

I enjoyed last year’s Ventana (single) Cone Adventure so much that I came back to explore a new ascent route up Ventana Cone and a new descent route from Lion Rock. I climbed both peaks on the Ventana Triple Crown route last year, but in my opinion climbing Ventana Cone and Lion Rock from the Carmel River is more aesthetic as it includes some amazing creek walking, waterfalls and Santa Lucia Fir groves. Both routes went as planned and proved to be efficient ways to climb both Ventana Cone and Lion Rock with relatively light brush in a trail-less region where bushwhacking is notoriously arduous. Ventana Cone is not visited very often (I was the first entry of 2016) and Lion Rock is visited even less frequently with only on a few parties known to have stood on its rocky summit in the last several decades. The stretch from Kandlbinder to Ventana Cone is the most rugged and wild region in all of the Ventana (and arguably the coastal ranges of the West Coast) so it is always a pleasure to visit this area.  As with last year, the first part of the morning entailed running the Carmel River Trail from Los Padres Dam traveling nearly 10 miles deep into the canyon to Hiding Canyon Camp, a nice camp with Santa Lucia Firs and a tall ponderosa pine. Another 1.5 miles leads to Round Rock Camp. The trail to Round Rock Camp has some brush and blowdowns but still seems faster than walking in the river. Beyond Round Rock Camp is all off-trail, mostly creek-walking through a stunningly beautiful canyon of turqoise pools, slick rock, cascades, house-sized boulders, ferns, and moss. The amazing lushness of this deep canyon with several different varieties of ferns, and moss covering virtually everything creates a scene fit for Jurassic Park. Almost everything is photogenic. However, unlike last year, I took the first creek that enters the main tributary instead of continuing to the head of the canyon (my return route would include the entire canyon). This small creek does not produce enough flow to clear out the riparian brush so it is difficult in its lower reaches and I found much progress on the slopes above the stream bed. Eventually the stream opens up into a long talus field, at first under oak trees but increasingly a Santa Lucia Fir forest as one ascends the steepening slopes. The old growth Santa Lucia firs in the upper part of this drainage are simply amazing. The talus staircase is fairly stable and therefore an efficient route all the way up to a high notch where one must traverse into another drainage for the final climb up to Ventana Cone. This traverse includes some light brush with the burnt vegetation being the greater impediment. A final talus slope provides efficient access to the ridge near the summit of Ventana Cone. The view from Ventana Cone was just as I had remembered it from prior visits with a 360 degree panorama taking in the entire northern part of the Santa Lucia Mountains. Close at hand are the Ventana Spires, Ventana Double Cone, Kandlbinder and Lion Rock. From Ventana Cone to Lion Rock I used the same route as I did on the Triple Crown, generally staying on the east side of the ridge in talus slopes with Santa Lucia Firs. Lion Rock is an unofficial name I gave this majrestic peak that sits at the head of Lion Creek. Lion Rock is rugged and steep on all sides and an attractive peak from every direction. In fact, it’s one of my favorites in all of the Ventana. An old scrap register was left by legendary Ventana pioneer Ward Allison and Toshi Hosaka placed a new mini-register last year (no other signatures after his visit). From Lion Rock I descended the class 3 rock face and worked north to the top of a long and steep talus slope. Unlike the earlier talus slope, this one had much smaller, looser rock and the descent was rather tedious, but still much more efficient and pleasant than a bushwhack. This talus slope continued virtually unabated for over a thousand vertical feet before I reached more more mixed terrain. As the creek picked up flow I found myself increasingly in the stream descending into the lovely canyon with bedrock cascades, fern gardens and moss covered rocks. There are several beautiful waterfalls in this drainage including Spire Falls, Lion Rock Falls, Ventana Cone Falls, Carmel Falls and the Carmel Gorge.