Wildcat Point & Cold Mountain

Wildcat Point and Cold Mountain are two fairly remote and obscure destinations north of Tuolumne Meadows between the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne and canyon country of northeast Yosemite. The scenery at both locations is stunning. Wildcat Point is to the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne what Clouds Rest is to Tenaya Canyon; a lofty viewpoint perched thousands of feet above a rugged granitic canyon. The primary difference between the two is that Wildcat Point does not have a trail and it’s rarely visited. Meanwhile, Cold Mountain is not a high or remarkable summit by most standards, but its isolated and central position surrounded by deep canyons provides a spectacular 360 degree view, especially into northerneast Yosemite’s canyon country to Sawtooth Ridge. Just to the north of Cold Mountain is a subsidiary peaklet I dubbed “Cold Point” which contains an amazing view of rarely seen Virginia Lake with a sea of granite peaks and domes in the background.  Starting at Tuolumne Meadows I started by taking the trail to Glen Aulin. I ran into quite a bit of snow and ice covering the trail which slowed things down; it was November after all. From Glen Aulin I started down the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne but soon turned off the trail to head up beautiful smooth granite slabs toward Wildcat Point. Views of the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne opened up with each step. About halfway up the side of the canyon I took a shallow gully with a little bit of brush to the upper granitic slopes that were more moderately sloped with easy terrain leading to the base of Wildcat Point, which is more of a dome. After some brief scrambling I was at the top marveling at the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne several thousand feet below. The views are excellent from the top of the dome, but the best views of the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne are further down the ridge at a point where the gentle granite slabs end and a sheer drop into the canyon begins. From this point one can gaze from Tuolumne Meadows to all the way down the Canyon to Pate Valley. Wildcat View provides perhaps the best view of Tuolumne Peak as it rises impressively on the south side of the canyon with cliffs and buttresses leading all the way down to the canyon bottom. From Wildcat Point I traversed a pleasant alpine basin to Cold Mountain, which included beautiful Mattie Lake and another unnamed alpine lake directly below Cold Mountain. The final ascent to Cold Mountain was on friendly granite slabs. Ironically, the summit of Cold Mountain was warm for November. I enjoyed the view over lunch with calm winds and blazing sunshine. Gazing over miles of wilderness in all directions I experienced true solitude as the snowy trail conditions and late season meant that I was the only human around for miles. After my summit break I explored the area, including a visit to a peaklet north of the summit I dubbed “Cold Point.” This spot had perhaps my favorite view of the day with a spectacular vantage of rarely seen Virginia Lake and a sea of granite domes in the background culminating in rugged Sawtooth Ridge and Whorl Mountain above Matterhnorn Canyon. From Cold Mountain I descended forested slopes to Cold Canyon where I found the trail back to Glen Aulin. On the way back from Glen Aulin, instead of returning by trail, I visited a number of domes with excellent views of Tuolumne Meadows and the Cathedral Range. The day finished with an delightful sunset from Olmstead Point (the actual point, not the parking lot). Full album here and GPS route here

Half Dome’s Diving Board

Two spots are referred to as the Diving Board on Half Dome. The most commonly visited, but unofficial diving board is located near the summit on a small overhanging lip above the precipitous northwest face. This feature has also been named “The Visor” and is the preferred name to differentiate with the official Diving Board (as labelled on the USGS topographic maps) located just west of Half Dome and directly below the northwest face. Discussion of the Diving Board hereinafter refers to the official Diving Board. The Diving Board is the location of one of Ansel Adams’ most famous photos, Monolith, the Face of Half Dome, taken in 1927. Ansel was mesmerized by this location and described it as a “wondrous place… a great shelf of granite, slightly overhanging, and nearly 4000 feet above its base…the most exciting subject awaiting me.”  87 years later the Diving Board is just as captivating with the perspective of Half Dome from the Diving Board simply spectacular. The northwest face rises a sheer 2,000 feet and takes on the appearance of a colossal skyscraper. Most of the day the face is in the shade but in the afternoon it is slowly “revealed” from left to right as the sun progresses toward the western horizon. Ansel Adams captured this transition beautifully in his photo, remarking that he saw “the majesty of the sculptural shape of the Dome in the solemn effect of half sunlight and half shadow.” Ultimately, the entire face is illuminated by the afternoon sunlight and the evening progression brings an array of colors from grayish white in the late afternoon to yellow in the evening to orange at sunset and finally reddish at alpenglow.

The Diving Board is not far from the hustle and bustle of Yosemite Valley, but no trail reaches the point and any route requires some navigation and route finding skills. The most common and easiest route utilizes a use path that starts above Vernal Falls that travels behind Liberty Cap and Mount Broderick to Lost Lake. The use path continues past Lost Lake to a small saddle between Mount Broderick and Half Dome and then descends on the other side of the saddle before beginning a climb up steep slopes to the Diving Board. The more scenic and aesthetic route, known as “The Ledges” takes a different use path uphill from the Broderick-Half Dome Saddle to a series of well-placed ledges that cut across a granite slope. The Ledges route is the rock climbers’ approach to the popular Snake Dike route and other rock climbs in the vicinity. With close attention to cairns marking the path of least resistance, most brush can be avoided on this approach route. When the route reaches the ever-steepening cliffs of Half Dome’s southwest face, the ledges cut across the granite to climbers left. The various ledges are separated by short sections of class 3 climbing and a couple friction moves on the granite. From the ledges there are excellent views of Little Yosemite Valley, Cascade Cliffs, Bunnell Point, Mount Starr King and Mount Clark. Beyond the ledges, the approach switchbacks up to the start of the Snake Dike route. For the Diving Board, leave the approach route before it reaches the base of Half Dome and traverse right across lightly bushy terrain to a forested area in a small bowl. From the forest, travel up steep gravel slopes for the final couple hundred feet of vertical to the Diving Board.

The view from the Diving Board is remarkable. Aside from Half Dome’s massive northwest face front and center, North Dome, Basket Dome and Mount Watkins are prominent across Tenaya Canyon. Most of the major features of Yosemite Valley are visible including Glacier Point, the Royal Arches, Washington Column, Yosemite Falls, Eagle Peak and El Capitan. The view immediately below from the overhanging rock is vertigo-inducing with nearly 3,000 feet of air to the floor of Yosemite Valley. On this day, the black oaks and maple trees in the Valley were in full fall color adding further intrigue to the view at the bottom of the precipitous drop. An alternative approach route to Lost Lake is the small gully between Liberty Cap and Mount Broderick. This narrow corridor is situated between too massive, sculpted granite features and is worth the extra time and effort versus the easy usetrail above Vernal Falls. The route to this corridor between Liberty Cap and Mount Broderick begins at the point where the Mist Trail touches the granite of Liberty Cap. The use path traverses alongside the base of of Liberty Cap before dropping into the gully. Once in the gully it’s fairly obvious to head up the narrow corridor passing by some pine and fir trees along the way and a hanging valley with a meadow. The final portion enters a forest of fir and aspen before joining up with the primary use path to Lost Lake. The first dozen or so photos below are from this alternative route through the Broderick-Liberty Gap corridor and the remainder are from the Ledges Route and the Diving Board in general chronological order as the sunlight exposed the northwest face of Half Dome and the subsequent evening light progression. The Diving Board is certainly a spot I will return to experience in different season with varying light angles and clouds. I also hope to visit the spot when it is snow covered.     

Electra Loop – Electra Peak & Lyell Fork Merced River

The Lyell Fork of the Merced River is one of the most remote and rugged regions in Yosemite National Park. Any approach requires many miles on trail followed by off-trail travel. The lower part of the drainage features a splendid series of meadows as the river snakes through a grassland with an amazing view upstream to the chiseled rideline including Mount Ansel Adams and Electra Peak. Higher up in the basin, the forest thins and the terrain transitions to a granite playground with a series of spectacular alpine lakes. It seems as if each lake has a different color, from midnight blue to milky turquoise.  It’s not entirely clear to me what is responsible for producing the different colors when the lakes are all connected and in such close proximity, but the resulting palette is magical. At the highest reaches of the basin the terrain is entirely devoid of vegetation and the uppermost lakes sit in a strikingly barren landscape of talus and granite. Above these uppermost lakes is the roof of Yosemite, Mount Lyell, at 13,120 feet above sea level and the highest point in the national park. I have looked down into the Lyell Fork of the Merced River from numerous points including Mount Lyell, Foerster Peak and Rodgers Peak and I have always wanted to explore the basin. In order to accomplish this goal, I designed an aesthetic loop out of Tuolumne Meadows that would include the Lyell Fork of the Merced River and also the summit of Electra Peak, one of the more remote summits in Yosemite with a grand view of the region. Since Electra Peak is the central feature of the route I called it the “Electra Loop” and entails nearly 44 miles and close to 10,000 feet of elevation gain. The loop is similar to the Roof of Yosemite Loop I did earlier this year but is a bit longer to incorporate the Lyell Fork Merced River and Electra Peak. GPS route info here.

The route starts with a trek up Lyell Canyon on the John Muir Trail, one of the most runnable stretches of trail in the High Sierra. At the head of the canyon is a climb up to Donohue Pass with an excellent view of Mount Lyell and Mount Maclure. Soon after Dononhue Pass leave the trail and head south through easy alpine terrain to the meadows beneath Marie Lakes where the Marie Lakes trail is intersected. A short climb on this trail brings one to Lower Marie Lake. From here continue cross country up a ridge on the south side of the lake and then traverse granite and talus slopes to North Clinch Pass. Lower Marie Lake is a large body of water and includes stupendous views of Mount Lyell and also across Rush Creek basin to Donohue Peak and Mount Andrea Lawrence. The narrow ridgeline is particularly scenic with a “secret Marie Lake” visible deep in a granite bowl. The direct route over North Clinch Pass includes some class 3 scrambling on its south side but it looks like a somewhat circuitous detour south along the ridge could eliminate the class 3 altogether. Passage through North Clinch Pass brings one into the remote upper reaches of the North Fork San Joaquin River. This drainage, like the Lyell Fork of the Merced River, is rarely visited but a real gem of the High Sierra. My passage through this basin was at its uppermost reach via a high traverse to Electra Peak on talus and granite slabs. I could see the numerous inviting lakes below, but my path would remain above them.  I look forward to visiting these lakes in the future. in fact, the High Sierra Route passes through perhaps the most dramatic part of the North Fork San Joaquin River drainage as it descends from Lake Catherine and traverses to Twin Island Lakes with wild views of the North Fork San Joaquin River Canyon and Mount Ritter and Banner Peak towering above. After the traverse of the headwaters of the North Fork San Joaquin River to Lake 11,815, the climb of Electra Peak’s north ridge is a straightforward scramble on talus and then some rock on the final portion on the ridge. The view from the summit is incredible and takes in a 360 degree panorama encompassing everything from Half Dome to the Clark Range to Mount Lyell to Ritter and Banner.  The best view in my opinion looks down the Lyell Fork of the Merced River with it’s numerous colorful lakes and beautiful meadows. From the summit, descend Electra’s northwest slope (talus and slabs) to Lake 10,999, a deep blue lake situated in a barren granitic landscape. Descending down the drainage from Lake 10,999 leads to Lake 10,702 tucked in beneath a rugged ridge extending to Mount Ansel Adams. A descent down a minor headwall beneath Lake 10,702 leads to a lake with striking bright turquoise color. This lake is not even assigned an elevation on the topo maps, but is one of the unique highlights of this region. The next lake on the trip down the Lyell Fork is perhaps the most spectacular and is labelled as Lake 10,217 on the topo map. This lake retains some of the turqouise color as the previous lake but has a bit more of a blueish tint. The lake also includes more vegetation along its shores, an alpine beach, and an elongated shape that makes it look like a swimming lane with Mount Ansel Adams and Foerster Peak towering above. This is certainly a spot I could spend some time relaxing!  Below Lake 10,217 is the primary headwall of the drainage and includes a fair amount of micro-navigating to avoid small cliff bands (although numerous routes are available). Below the headwall, travel becomes easier through open forest eventually reaching the splendid meadows. From the meadows it’s about a mile downstream through forest and granite slabs to the Isberg Pass Trail which is taken north to the Lewis Creek Trail. The ascent up the Lewis Creek Trail leads to Vogelsang Pass and then down the Rafferty Creek trail back to Tuolumne Meadows. GPS route info here.  

The Roof of Yosemite Loop

The Roof of Yosemite Loop travels to the highest point in Yosemite National Park on 13,114 ft Mount Lyell and also includes ascents of 12,900 ft Mount Maclure (5th highest in the park) and 12,561 ft Mount Florence (9th highest in the park). Moreover, Lyell, Maclure and Florence are the three highest named summits in the incredibly scenic Cathedral Range, a spur of the Sierra crest that runs from Tuolumne Meadows to Mount Lyell. The region around Mount Lyell is definitely the most alpine in Yosemite and arguably the most rugged as well. The western side of Lyell and Maclure are particularly rugged and remote with no trail access into Hutchings Creek basin or the Lyell Fork of the Merced River. Nestled between Lyell and Maclure is one of the largest remaining permanent snowfields in the Sierra Nevada. Sadly, this formerly proud glacier was declared no longer active last year.  A glacier requires movement of the underlying ice over a slope, but Lyell Glacier’s rapid retreat and mass melting over the last several decades has taken a toll and the ice has now stopped moving altogether. A snow capped Lyell is an iconic view from the southern end of Lyell Canyon, and while snow remains on Lyell year-around to this day, it is sobering to think that Mount Lyell could be devoid of all permanent snow in as little as 25 years according to scientists. The effects of global warming, and especially the rapid warming of California, are plainly visible in the high Sierra. 

The Roof of Yosemite Loop combines many of the highlights of this region into an aesthetic and highly scenic loop. The route starts with a pleasant trip up one of the easiest stretches of trail in the Sierra in lovely Lyell Canyon next to meadows and the meandering Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne River. After an ascent out of Lyell Canyon, a picturesque alpine lake is reached below Donohue Pass. From here, there are a couple ways to reach the Lyell Glacier, but I’ve found the most scenic is to leave the John Muir Trail before it switchbacks to begin the final push to Donohue Pass and ascend west up meadows to an alpine lake with a stellar view of Mount Lyell. From the lake, some talus and low angle granite slabs lead up the northeast ridge of Mount Maclure to some glacial lakes and the snowfield of Lyell “Glacier”. Cross the glacier heading for the northwest ridge and ascend the class 3/4 ridge; the hardest moves are near the bottom and then the angle lessens for the final couple hundred feet of vertical to the summit.  Retrace steps to the pass between Lyell and Maclure and ascend Mount Maclure’s SW slope which is mostly class 2. Both Maclure and Lyell provide amazing views of the surrounding region, including the Ritter Range, Cathedral Range, Clark Range, Sierra Crest and Yosemite Valley. From Mount Maclure descend the class 3 southwest chute to the upper reaches of Hutchings Creek basin. The basin is divided into two lobes by Peak 12,358, but the southern lobe is far more scenic with the great cliffs of Mount Lyell’s western face, Mount Maclure and the granitic north side of Peak 12,767 towering above. These peaks provide an awesome backdrop from the many alpine tarns and lakes in the remote basin.

Annotated view from Mount Florence (large version here):

View north from Mount Lyell (large version here):

Off-Trail Portion Close-up:

Lyell Glacier and Lyell Canyon from Mount Maclure (large version here):

From Hutchings Creek Basin, traverse to the south ridge of Mount Florence, gaining the ridge most easily at the broad saddle between point 11,647 and Mount Florence. The ascent of Mount Florence is straightforward class 2 on large talus blocks which can be a bit cumbersome at times. Mount Florence has one of the best views in Yosemite with an amazing panorama including most of Yosemite National Park.  From Mount Florence descend talus and sand down the west ridge and then more cumbersome talus down to Lake 10,541 ft, a classic Sierra gem. The north face of Mount Florence towers above this beautiful lake with striking blue waters.  From Lake 10,541 head north and northwest traversing easy off-trail terrain before descending into the Lewis Creek drainage to meet up with the Lewis Creek Trail at ~9,600 ft. Take the trail to Vogelsang Pass, Vogelsang Lake and the Vogelsang High Sierra Camp. Complete the loop by going to Tuolumne Pass and taking the Rafferty Creek Trail back to Lyell Canyon.        

 

2013 Adventure Recap

2013 was an awesome year of adventures! From the coast to the High Sierra, there was a lot of everything. Browsing through my posts from this year really makes me appreciate living in California where it’s possible to enjoy a diverse set of adventures and occupy my desire to explore wild and rugged places year around.  This year was a little different in that I dealt with a major injury setback (Achilles and Soleus) in the Spring that required months of rehab and therapy. This precluded some of the more grand projects I had in mind, including FKT type aspirations. As the injury improved in the fall I was able to get out on some longer and faster outings which proved very memorable. Despite some frustrations with the injury I spent more time exploring the Sierra than in any prior year, which is very encouraging. This leaves me optimistic in thinking about what I can do if I’m healthy. I’ve already got many ideas for next year so the excitement level is high. Below is a complete list of this year’s adventures with a link to the blog post where I described that adventure in greater detail with many photos. Note: several adventures in the Ventana Wilderness along the Big Sur Coast occurred in late December 2013, but will be blogged in early 2014. I also envision putting together a list or online guide to my favorite Big Sur hikes and adventures.

  1. Glacier Point XC (December 31, 2012) 
  2. Dewey Point Snowshoe (January 1, 2013)
  3. Mount Silliman Snowshoe (January 19, 2013)
  4. Winter Alta & Moose Lake Snowshoe (January 20, 2013)
  5. Buena Vista Peak, Horse Ridge & Ostrander Snowshoe (February 10, 2013)
  6. Prairie Creek Redwoods (February 16-18, 2013)
  7. Jedediah Smith Redwoods (February 17, 2013)
  8. Point Reyes 27 mile loop (March 23, 2013)
  9. Pinnacles National Park (April 6, 2013)
  10. Doud Peak & Rocky Ridge (April 13, 2013)
  11. Post Summit & East Molera Ridge (April 14, 2013)
  12. Cone Peak via Stone Ridge Direct (April 20, 2013)
  13. Yosemite North Rim Tour (April 27, 2013)
  14. Clouds Rest via Yosemite Valley (April 28, 2013)
  15. Doud Peak & Rocky Ridge (May 11, 2013)
  16. Pico Blanco via Little Sur (May 12, 2013)
  17. Tenaya Rim Loop (May 19, 2013)
  18. Cherry Creek Canyon (May 25, 2013)
  19. Smith Peak (May 26, 2013)
  20. High Sierra Camps Loop (June 1, 2013)
  21. Tuolumne Explorations (June 2, 2013)
  22. Rodgers Peak (June 15, 2013)
  23. Sky Haven & Cloudripper (June 16, 2013)
  24. Volcanic Ridge and Minarets Loop (June 22, 2013)
  25. Mount Starr and Little Lakes Valley (June 23, 2013)
  26. Reinstein & Godard Fastpacking (June 29-30, 2013)
  27. Mount Florence (July 5, 2013)
  28. Onion Valley to South Lake (July 6, 2013)
  29. Mount Hoffman (July 7, 2013)
  30. Tapto Lakes (July 19-21, 2013)
  31. Desolation Seven Summits (July 28, 2013)
  32. Pinnacles National Park (August 4, 2013)
  33. Red Slate Mountain (August 10, 2013)
  34. Sawtooth Loop: Matterhorn Peak, Finger Peaks, Kettle Peak (August 11, 2013)
  35. Mount Stanford & Kings-Kern Loop (August 24, 2013)
  36. Mount Shasta via Clear Creek (August 31, 2013)
  37. Trinity Alps Traverse: Mount Hilton, Wedding Cake, Thompson Peak (September 1, 2013)
  38. Caribou Lakes (September 2, 2013)
  39. Lion Loop: Lion Rock & Triple Divide Peak (September 8, 2013)
  40. Kaweah Queen, Lawson Peak & Kaweah Gap (September 15, 2013)
  41. Whitney to Langley via Miter Basin (September 28, 2013)
  42. Tulainyo Lake: Cleaver Peak and Mount Carillon (September 29, 2013)
  43. Robinson Peak (October 5, 2013)
  44. Little Lakes Valley (October 5, 2013)
  45. Mount Winchell & Mount Robinson (October 6, 2013)
  46. Andrew Molera (October 13, 2013)
  47. Foerster Peak (October 19, 2013)
  48. Tuolumne to Devils Postpile via Minarets and Donohue Peak (October 22, 2013)
  49. Monarch Divide Semi-Loop: Kennedy Mountain, Munger Peak, Goat Mountain (October 27, 2013)
  50. Cone Peak Marathon (November 3, 2013)
  51. Clouds Rest & Yosemite’s South Rim (November 9, 2013)
  52. Point Reyes South District Loop (November 24, 2013)
  53. Junipero Serra Peak (December 8, 2013)
  54. Cone Peak via Stone Ridge and North Coast Trail (December 15, 2013)
  55. Boronda/De Angulo Loop (December 21, 2013)
  56. Partington Cove to McWay Falls (December 22, 2013) 
  57. Sierra Hill at Brazil Ranch (December 22, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]
  58. Ventana Double Cone (December 24, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]
  59. Limekiln to Big Sur via the Coast Ridge (December 28, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]
  60. Prewitt Ridge (December 29, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]

Clouds Rest & Yosemite’s Complete South Rim

While I know that Yosemite Valley is beautiful any time of the year, I had not experienced the Valley in the fall and I was eager to see some new trails (for me) on the south rim. A Saturday in early November was a great opportunity with the trails on the rim remaining largely snow-free. I designed a 38+ mile tour of the south rim of Yosemite Valley from Clouds Rest to Wawona Tunnel starting with the classic ascent up the Mist Trail from Happy Isles. The aesthetic point-to-point included a number of famous vistas: Clouds Rest, Panorama Point, Panorama Point Overlook, Glacier Point, Sentinel Dome, Taft Point, Dewey Point, Crocker Point, Stanford Point, Inspiration Point and Artist Point. It was amazing to see the changing appearance of Half Dome and El Capitan, the most prominent features in the Valley,  as I made my way west along the South Rim. The biggest climb (6,000+ ft) is right at the beginning from the Valley to the summit of Clouds Rest, but the 2,500 ft of climbing from Illilouette Creek to Sentinel Dome is not easy either. All told, there is probably over 12,000 ft of climbing on the route. Beyond Sentinel Dome, the final 12 miles is largely downhill save for some moderate ascent to Dewey Point after crossing Bridalveil Creek. For a high resolution 360 degree annotated panorama from the summit of Clouds Rest, click on the image below or here. 

We encountered a surprising amount of snow in the shaded forest between Taft Point and Dewey Point, but overall the trails were in good condition. Panorama Point (not to be confused with Panorama Point Overlook) is a short-off trail hike along a ridgeline with nice 360 degree views. The highest point is at the end of the ridge. Panorama Point Overlook is just off the trail about 700 vertical feet below Panorama Point. A use path leaves the main trail at a switchback above Illilouette canyon, but there is no sign. It looks as if Panorama Point Overlook was once a bona fide vista, but the guardrail has since been removed (or fell off the cliff?) and it’s now one of the hidden gems of the Valley. Being late in the season, it was generally dry and the restroom facilities and water fountain at Glacier Point were closed. This means that if you are going out for a long run you must plan ahead for water locations. In fact, after Illilouette Creek, there is only one suitable water source on the route at Bridalveil Creek. Beyond Sentinel Dome, the focal point of the view is the immense granite wall of El Capitan. Taft Point is a tremendous viewpoint with some nice exposure for photogenic photography.  Continuing along the rim, we enjoyed magnificent evening light as we passed Dewey Point, Crocker Point and Stanford Point.  It took awhile to find the unobstructed view, but sunset at Inspiration Point was nice and post-sunset glow at Artist Point wrapped up a great day on the Yosemite trails.    

Foerster Peak

Fall is one of my favorite times of the year in the Sierra. This time of year comes after the summer monsoon thunderstorm season but before winter storms roll in off the Pacific burying the high country in snow. The result is weather that is characterized by numerous clear and crisp days interspersed with the occasional light snowfall.  Mosquitoes and crowds are non-existent, and the trails are in great condition.  Foerster Peak hadn’t really been on my radar, or the entire region for that matter, but while looking at the maps midweek it looked like a nice objective and I’m always interested in visiting new spots off the beaten path. Joey joined me for this trip and we both agreed this adventure far exceeded expectations entailing a beautiful off-trail approach through Long Creek to Rockbound Lake and the exquisite Blue Lake, and a stellar 360 degree summit panorama including the entire Clark Range and much of the Cathedral Range and Ritter Range. My favorite view was the rarely seen west side of the jagged Minarets. Strava route here.

A sweeping 360 degree annotated panorama from the summit of Foerster Peak can be found here or be clicking on the image below for a much larger image. 

Clark Range Panorama (click image for larger version): 

We started the trip from Isberg Pass Trailhead after a long, bumpy ride on the Beasore Rd. While this route is shorter, the pavement on Beasore road is so badly eroded it’s actually worse than if the road had been all gravel.  We parked about 0.6 miles from the trailhead to avoid a rocky section of road (the reality of driving low clearance cars). On the way back we took the Minaret Road which is substantially longer in distance, but a much better drive due to its smooth pavement. We followed the Isberg Pass Trail through the Niche and shortly thereafter broke off on the Chetwood Cabin Trail. The montane forest and meadows were so pleasant for running we passed the dilapidated Chetwood Cabin without even noticing it, which meant we also passed the location where we were supposed to turn off. On the way back we took the old use trail that we were supposed to take in the morning and came to the conclusion that trying to follow this path is essentially useless and our unintended off-trail route in the morning was more efficient. A couple years ago a major windstorm blew through the forest and toppled countless trees over the old trail. Combined with lack of use, the old path has grown very faint and difficult to follow.

Back to the morning, we discovered our “error” of overshooting Chetwood Cabin when we came to a second junction for Cora Lakes. Instead of backtracking we headed uphill cross country to a saddle on the east side of Sadler Peak. The cross country travel proved to be very efficient and straightforward and it turns out this is my recommended route versus the route we took in the afternoon. Thus, for the most direct route into Long Creek I would stay straight past the Niche heading to Cora Lakes and then head cross country from the second junction with the Chetwood Cabin trail.  Beyond the saddle on Sadler Peak’s east side, the use trail can be picked up again with numerous cairns and followed down to Long Creek where the trail ends for good. Travel up the granite canyon of Long Creek is a pleasure with a babbling stream, grassy meadows and clumps of trees amid a setting that is predominantly ice-polished granite. At the headwaters of Long Creek we turned east ascending slabs and grass over a ridge to spectacular Blue Lake with a perfect backdrop of Mount Ritter, Banner Peak and the Minarets. At Blue Lake, Foerster Peak is finally within striking distance. The final scramble starts with an ascent up a grassy ramp, followed by granite slabs, and finally some talus hoping to the summit.


The challenge of Foerster Peak is clearly its remote location and not the straightforward scramble. The reward for reaching the summit is a truly remarkable vista, which was enhanced for us by a perfect fall day. We could see virtually all of the headwaters of the Merced River and the top of Half Dome. Mount Lyell and Mount Maclure (the roof of Yosemite) stood tall across the Lyell Fork of the Merced River with a series of high alpine lakes visible in the granite basin.  Close at hand was the rugged west face of Ansel Adams Peak and the ridge crest to Electra Peak and Rodgers Peak.  To the south, the rugged Ritter Range dominated the skyline with impressive views of the west side of the Mount Ritter and Banner Peak massif and the intricate spires of the Minarets. Over our stay at the summit, we watched the light on the Ritter Range become increasingly better. After spending over 45 minutes on top, we retraced our steps to Blue Lake and stopped for a photography extravaganza along its blue shores… just great!

The final views of the day (before entering forest) were near Sadler Peak with excellent afternoon light on the Minarets and the North Fork San Joaquin River canyon. I look forward to climbing to the summit of Sadler and taking the 2 mile ridge to Long Peak in the future. This ridge is sure to have excellent views for its entire length. Enjoying this last view, we thought we were set for a fairly easy last 8 miles back to the trailhead, but we were wrong.  The old use path we were supposed to take in the morning from Chetwood Cabin proved extremely challenging to follow with copious downfall to navigate. In fairness, the Tom Harrison Map does not show this trail at all and we were relying too heavily on outdated USGS topo maps. This region has seen more foot traffic in the past.  In the end, we decided the unintended cross country route taken in the morning was now a more efficient, superior access route to Long Creek and Foerster Peak. After what seemed like a long time, we finally popped out into a meadow and saw the ruins of the Chetwood Cabin indicating we were back on familiar ground and maintained trail. From this point we made good time back the trailhead. Foerster peak and this remote region far exceeded expectations and I will definitely be back for further exploration!