2013 Adventure Recap

2013 was an awesome year of adventures! From the coast to the High Sierra, there was a lot of everything. Browsing through my posts from this year really makes me appreciate living in California where it’s possible to enjoy a diverse set of adventures and occupy my desire to explore wild and rugged places year around.  This year was a little different in that I dealt with a major injury setback (Achilles and Soleus) in the Spring that required months of rehab and therapy. This precluded some of the more grand projects I had in mind, including FKT type aspirations. As the injury improved in the fall I was able to get out on some longer and faster outings which proved very memorable. Despite some frustrations with the injury I spent more time exploring the Sierra than in any prior year, which is very encouraging. This leaves me optimistic in thinking about what I can do if I’m healthy. I’ve already got many ideas for next year so the excitement level is high. Below is a complete list of this year’s adventures with a link to the blog post where I described that adventure in greater detail with many photos. Note: several adventures in the Ventana Wilderness along the Big Sur Coast occurred in late December 2013, but will be blogged in early 2014. I also envision putting together a list or online guide to my favorite Big Sur hikes and adventures.

  1. Glacier Point XC (December 31, 2012) 
  2. Dewey Point Snowshoe (January 1, 2013)
  3. Mount Silliman Snowshoe (January 19, 2013)
  4. Winter Alta & Moose Lake Snowshoe (January 20, 2013)
  5. Buena Vista Peak, Horse Ridge & Ostrander Snowshoe (February 10, 2013)
  6. Prairie Creek Redwoods (February 16-18, 2013)
  7. Jedediah Smith Redwoods (February 17, 2013)
  8. Point Reyes 27 mile loop (March 23, 2013)
  9. Pinnacles National Park (April 6, 2013)
  10. Doud Peak & Rocky Ridge (April 13, 2013)
  11. Post Summit & East Molera Ridge (April 14, 2013)
  12. Cone Peak via Stone Ridge Direct (April 20, 2013)
  13. Yosemite North Rim Tour (April 27, 2013)
  14. Clouds Rest via Yosemite Valley (April 28, 2013)
  15. Doud Peak & Rocky Ridge (May 11, 2013)
  16. Pico Blanco via Little Sur (May 12, 2013)
  17. Tenaya Rim Loop (May 19, 2013)
  18. Cherry Creek Canyon (May 25, 2013)
  19. Smith Peak (May 26, 2013)
  20. High Sierra Camps Loop (June 1, 2013)
  21. Tuolumne Explorations (June 2, 2013)
  22. Rodgers Peak (June 15, 2013)
  23. Sky Haven & Cloudripper (June 16, 2013)
  24. Volcanic Ridge and Minarets Loop (June 22, 2013)
  25. Mount Starr and Little Lakes Valley (June 23, 2013)
  26. Reinstein & Godard Fastpacking (June 29-30, 2013)
  27. Mount Florence (July 5, 2013)
  28. Onion Valley to South Lake (July 6, 2013)
  29. Mount Hoffman (July 7, 2013)
  30. Tapto Lakes (July 19-21, 2013)
  31. Desolation Seven Summits (July 28, 2013)
  32. Pinnacles National Park (August 4, 2013)
  33. Red Slate Mountain (August 10, 2013)
  34. Sawtooth Loop: Matterhorn Peak, Finger Peaks, Kettle Peak (August 11, 2013)
  35. Mount Stanford & Kings-Kern Loop (August 24, 2013)
  36. Mount Shasta via Clear Creek (August 31, 2013)
  37. Trinity Alps Traverse: Mount Hilton, Wedding Cake, Thompson Peak (September 1, 2013)
  38. Caribou Lakes (September 2, 2013)
  39. Lion Loop: Lion Rock & Triple Divide Peak (September 8, 2013)
  40. Kaweah Queen, Lawson Peak & Kaweah Gap (September 15, 2013)
  41. Whitney to Langley via Miter Basin (September 28, 2013)
  42. Tulainyo Lake: Cleaver Peak and Mount Carillon (September 29, 2013)
  43. Robinson Peak (October 5, 2013)
  44. Little Lakes Valley (October 5, 2013)
  45. Mount Winchell & Mount Robinson (October 6, 2013)
  46. Andrew Molera (October 13, 2013)
  47. Foerster Peak (October 19, 2013)
  48. Tuolumne to Devils Postpile via Minarets and Donohue Peak (October 22, 2013)
  49. Monarch Divide Semi-Loop: Kennedy Mountain, Munger Peak, Goat Mountain (October 27, 2013)
  50. Cone Peak Marathon (November 3, 2013)
  51. Clouds Rest & Yosemite’s South Rim (November 9, 2013)
  52. Point Reyes South District Loop (November 24, 2013)
  53. Junipero Serra Peak (December 8, 2013)
  54. Cone Peak via Stone Ridge and North Coast Trail (December 15, 2013)
  55. Boronda/De Angulo Loop (December 21, 2013)
  56. Partington Cove to McWay Falls (December 22, 2013) 
  57. Sierra Hill at Brazil Ranch (December 22, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]
  58. Ventana Double Cone (December 24, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]
  59. Limekiln to Big Sur via the Coast Ridge (December 28, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]
  60. Prewitt Ridge (December 29, 2013) [Blog Post Coming Soon]

“Lion Loop” – Lion Rock and Triple Divide Peak

The “Lion Loop” is a spectacular large loop that I designed out of Wolverton utilizing the High Sierra Trail and the Tablelands to access one of the most remote corners of the High Sierra along the Great Western Divide. Lion Lake is the centerpiece feature of the route and is absolutely stunning with Triple Divide Peak and Lion Rock creating an impressive background against its azure waters. The entire region is highly scenic with a rugged and wild feeling that is among the finest in all of the High Sierra.  Strava route here.

I started at 3:25 a.m. and had about 2.5 hours of nighttime running through Bearpaw meadows. Continuing to Tamarack Lake I gazed up at the impressive granite domes and faces lining the canyon. Beyond Tamarack Lake, I made my way efficiently up granite slabs and benches until the last 500 vertical to the summit of Lion Rock. There is some loose rock in this final scramble section and the class 3 route was not immediately obvious, but not hidden either and I soon found myself at the summit enjoying a magnificent view in all directions, but the favorite angle was down to Lion Lake glistening in the early morning sunlight framed by the triangular-shaped Triple Divide Peak. From the summit of Lion Rock I decided to attempt descending the northeast chute. At first the downclimbing was easy but then I reached a crux portion – the final few feet to get into the chute proper was pretty smooth granite with few features. I’m not a rock climber so I was not comfortable with most of the options until I found a solution across the face and into the chute that I could manage. It was probably low 5th class. There might have been a third class access point somewhere, but I didn’t find it and I’m thinking access is much easier when the chute is filled with snow. After gently lowering myself through the remainder of the extremely loose and steep chute, travel was surprisingly straightforward and efficient to Lion Lake where I enjoyed the stupendous views of the lake and surroundings every step of the way. 

Rounding my way around Lion Lake, I then went up to Lion Lake Pass. From the pass, I went around a buttress to beautiful Glacier Lake. The lake is tucked in under an impressive rock face and reminds me of Precipice Lake along the High Sierra Trail. The view from the lake down Cloud Canyon and the Whaleback are equally impressive. From Glacier Lake, I took a loose chute up Triple Divide’s north face with some fun class 3 scrambling in the upper reaches. Triple Divide Peak is aptly named as it divides the three primary river drainages of the Southern Sierra: the Kings, Kern and Kaweah.  From Triple Divide I returned back to Glacier Lake and just below Lion Lake Pass before traversing toward Copper Mine Pass. Instead of going to the pass I ascended the peak at the head of basin dividing Cloud Canyon and Deadman Canyon – “Copper Mine Peak.” This peak featured more amazing views down both of these canyons. From the summit of Copper Mine Peak an old use trail heads west to a saddle for easy access into Deadman Basin. In this area I passed by some rusty, old and rudimentary mining artifacts. The trek across Deadman Basin to Horn Col was spectacular with gorgeous views down Deadman canyon. From Horn Col, I traversed across the basin to Pterodactyl Pass and then rounded Big Bird Peak’s shoulder to the Tablelands. Descending the Tablelands through the Marble Fork of the Kaweah River was fast I was soon at the Pear Lake backcountry ranger outpost and on the maintained trail. From here it was a fairly quick jog over the last 6 miles back to Wolverton for a 15h42m minute day. Strava route here.

Winter Alta & Moose Lake Snowshoe

I had a great memories of a climb of Winter Alta in 2011 so I was excited to come back and this time I ventured further to remote Moose Lake (see route on Strava here).  The view from Winter Alta is simply outstanding. Overlooking Moose Lake and the Great Western Divide, it seems as if the entire range is at your feet.  At around 10,500 feet in elevation, Moose Lake is one of the largest high alpine lakes in the region. Nestled in a shallow bench, the lake is well above tree line which provides an unobstructed view of a large portion of the Great Western Divide and Black Kaweah.  The panorama of Moose Lake and all the peaks in the background is one of the greatest in all of the High Sierra. Complete photo album here.

This area is accessed via the Pear Lake ski hut and a marked winter trail from Wolverton.  The path from Wolverton to the ski hut is challenging for a snowshoe hike with lots of elevation gain but well worth the efforts. The slopes near the hut are fairly popular with backcountry skiers, but I found few tracks beyond a couple hundred feet above the hut and no tracks beyond Winter Alta.  Prior to summiting Winter Alta, I decided to continue further along the Tablelands to Moose Lake. The lake is about 850 feet below 11,328 foot Winter Alta which apparently deters most people from visiting. The snow conditions on this day oscillated between a stable crust and deep powder, but overall not bad for efficient progress. I made my way down some moderately sleep slopes and soon found myself walking across the tundra that is a frozen Moose Lake. I crossed the lake at its center and my poles hit a solid ice platform about a foot and half underneath the top of the powder. From the far end of the lake, I admired the view down the Middle Fork of the Kaweah River, the Kaweah Gap area, and the line of peaks that stretched as far as the eye could see.

I recrossed the lake at a different point and headed up for the summit of Winter Alta taking many photos and video clips along the way. Calm conditions on the summit provided an incentive to stick around and enjoy the scenery for a bit. Once I packed up, the descent went fast and I decided to come down through Pear Lake. After some moderately steep (but soft) slopes, I was on top of frozen Pear Lake, which is located in a rugged granite cirque beneath the Alta Peak massif.  After some more photography and video, I headed down the slopes to the Pear Lake ski hut and started my return to Wolverton.  This proved to be another fantastic snowshoe outing in Sequoia National Park!  I look forward to coming back and exploring further along the Tablelands in the winter, perhaps all the way to Big Bird Peak for views down to Big Bird lake and closer views of the Great Western Divide.

Mount Silliman Snowshoe Climb

Mount Silliman rises 11,188 feet with over 4,500 feet of vertical  in a short distance from Lodgepole Visitor Center in Sequoia National Park. As its position is to the west of the main concentration of peaks along or near the Sierra Crest, the summit provides an amazing vantage of the range from the Yosmite high country all the way down to the end of the Great Western Divide. The view across Kings Canyon to the Palisades is particularly impressive, along with Mount Brewer and the line of peaks from Thunder Peak to Milestone Mountain.

In the summer, a use trail apparently leaves the Twin Lakes trail and provides relatively easy access up the drainage and to the peak. In the winter, however, no such trail exists. I started off at Lodgepole along a snowshoe track that was excellent for the first 2.0 miles as the trail slowly gained elevation. A (less defined snowshoe) track continued beyond the turnoff for Silliman Creek and I was optimistic somebody had kicked steps up to the summit or at least up the basin. No such luck. At a clearing in the trees at 8,200 ft, the tracks finished near a spot where a party had snow camped. It was all deep powder and trailblazing from here up another 3,000 feet to the summit. We had driven from the Bay Area that morning resulting in a start just after noon and it was fairly warm by this point (40s) so the snow was wet and heavy with resultant post-holing even with snowshoes. Each step was heavy and travel became exceptionally arduous until 10,000 feet when a thick crust on the snow supported my snowshoes. I made my way up to a sub-peak of Silliman with an amazing view down the Marble Fork of the Kaweah River and the Alta Peak massif that I would ascend the following day.

From the subpeak I made a quick descent down into Silliman Bowl and then climbed the final slopes up to Silliman’s summit. The southern foxtail pine forest near the top is one of the best I have seen with exquisite trunk formations and positioning. I enjoyed the 360 degree view from the top taking video and many photos before beginning my descent. Going downhill through the deep snow was a pleasure and it almost felt like jumping on pillow. I took many photos of Silliman Bowl and the high meadows. After entering the forest, the goal was to get back to Lodgepole before darkness and I was just able to make it in time. This is a fantastic snowshoe climb. If you’re prepared to break trail, you’ll be rewarded with awesome views and rugged scenery.