Electra Loop – Electra Peak & Lyell Fork Merced River

The Lyell Fork of the Merced River is one of the most remote and rugged regions in Yosemite National Park. Any approach requires many miles on trail followed by off-trail travel. The lower part of the drainage features a splendid series of meadows as the river snakes through a grassland with an amazing view upstream to the chiseled rideline including Mount Ansel Adams and Electra Peak. Higher up in the basin, the forest thins and the terrain transitions to a granite playground with a series of spectacular alpine lakes. It seems as if each lake has a different color, from midnight blue to milky turquoise.  It’s not entirely clear to me what is responsible for producing the different colors when the lakes are all connected and in such close proximity, but the resulting palette is magical. At the highest reaches of the basin the terrain is entirely devoid of vegetation and the uppermost lakes sit in a strikingly barren landscape of talus and granite. Above these uppermost lakes is the roof of Yosemite, Mount Lyell, at 13,120 feet above sea level and the highest point in the national park. I have looked down into the Lyell Fork of the Merced River from numerous points including Mount Lyell, Foerster Peak and Rodgers Peak and I have always wanted to explore the basin. In order to accomplish this goal, I designed an aesthetic loop out of Tuolumne Meadows that would include the Lyell Fork of the Merced River and also the summit of Electra Peak, one of the more remote summits in Yosemite with a grand view of the region. Since Electra Peak is the central feature of the route I called it the “Electra Loop” and entails nearly 44 miles and close to 10,000 feet of elevation gain. The loop is similar to the Roof of Yosemite Loop I did earlier this year but is a bit longer to incorporate the Lyell Fork Merced River and Electra Peak. GPS route info here.

The route starts with a trek up Lyell Canyon on the John Muir Trail, one of the most runnable stretches of trail in the High Sierra. At the head of the canyon is a climb up to Donohue Pass with an excellent view of Mount Lyell and Mount Maclure. Soon after Dononhue Pass leave the trail and head south through easy alpine terrain to the meadows beneath Marie Lakes where the Marie Lakes trail is intersected. A short climb on this trail brings one to Lower Marie Lake. From here continue cross country up a ridge on the south side of the lake and then traverse granite and talus slopes to North Clinch Pass. Lower Marie Lake is a large body of water and includes stupendous views of Mount Lyell and also across Rush Creek basin to Donohue Peak and Mount Andrea Lawrence. The narrow ridgeline is particularly scenic with a “secret Marie Lake” visible deep in a granite bowl. The direct route over North Clinch Pass includes some class 3 scrambling on its south side but it looks like a somewhat circuitous detour south along the ridge could eliminate the class 3 altogether. Passage through North Clinch Pass brings one into the remote upper reaches of the North Fork San Joaquin River. This drainage, like the Lyell Fork of the Merced River, is rarely visited but a real gem of the High Sierra. My passage through this basin was at its uppermost reach via a high traverse to Electra Peak on talus and granite slabs. I could see the numerous inviting lakes below, but my path would remain above them.  I look forward to visiting these lakes in the future. in fact, the High Sierra Route passes through perhaps the most dramatic part of the North Fork San Joaquin River drainage as it descends from Lake Catherine and traverses to Twin Island Lakes with wild views of the North Fork San Joaquin River Canyon and Mount Ritter and Banner Peak towering above. After the traverse of the headwaters of the North Fork San Joaquin River to Lake 11,815, the climb of Electra Peak’s north ridge is a straightforward scramble on talus and then some rock on the final portion on the ridge. The view from the summit is incredible and takes in a 360 degree panorama encompassing everything from Half Dome to the Clark Range to Mount Lyell to Ritter and Banner.  The best view in my opinion looks down the Lyell Fork of the Merced River with it’s numerous colorful lakes and beautiful meadows. From the summit, descend Electra’s northwest slope (talus and slabs) to Lake 10,999, a deep blue lake situated in a barren granitic landscape. Descending down the drainage from Lake 10,999 leads to Lake 10,702 tucked in beneath a rugged ridge extending to Mount Ansel Adams. A descent down a minor headwall beneath Lake 10,702 leads to a lake with striking bright turquoise color. This lake is not even assigned an elevation on the topo maps, but is one of the unique highlights of this region. The next lake on the trip down the Lyell Fork is perhaps the most spectacular and is labelled as Lake 10,217 on the topo map. This lake retains some of the turqouise color as the previous lake but has a bit more of a blueish tint. The lake also includes more vegetation along its shores, an alpine beach, and an elongated shape that makes it look like a swimming lane with Mount Ansel Adams and Foerster Peak towering above. This is certainly a spot I could spend some time relaxing!  Below Lake 10,217 is the primary headwall of the drainage and includes a fair amount of micro-navigating to avoid small cliff bands (although numerous routes are available). Below the headwall, travel becomes easier through open forest eventually reaching the splendid meadows. From the meadows it’s about a mile downstream through forest and granite slabs to the Isberg Pass Trail which is taken north to the Lewis Creek Trail. The ascent up the Lewis Creek Trail leads to Vogelsang Pass and then down the Rafferty Creek trail back to Tuolumne Meadows. GPS route info here.  

The Roof of Yosemite Loop

The Roof of Yosemite Loop travels to the highest point in Yosemite National Park on 13,114 ft Mount Lyell and also includes ascents of 12,900 ft Mount Maclure (5th highest in the park) and 12,561 ft Mount Florence (9th highest in the park). Moreover, Lyell, Maclure and Florence are the three highest named summits in the incredibly scenic Cathedral Range, a spur of the Sierra crest that runs from Tuolumne Meadows to Mount Lyell. The region around Mount Lyell is definitely the most alpine in Yosemite and arguably the most rugged as well. The western side of Lyell and Maclure are particularly rugged and remote with no trail access into Hutchings Creek basin or the Lyell Fork of the Merced River. Nestled between Lyell and Maclure is one of the largest remaining permanent snowfields in the Sierra Nevada. Sadly, this formerly proud glacier was declared no longer active last year.  A glacier requires movement of the underlying ice over a slope, but Lyell Glacier’s rapid retreat and mass melting over the last several decades has taken a toll and the ice has now stopped moving altogether. A snow capped Lyell is an iconic view from the southern end of Lyell Canyon, and while snow remains on Lyell year-around to this day, it is sobering to think that Mount Lyell could be devoid of all permanent snow in as little as 25 years according to scientists. The effects of global warming, and especially the rapid warming of California, are plainly visible in the high Sierra. 

The Roof of Yosemite Loop combines many of the highlights of this region into an aesthetic and highly scenic loop. The route starts with a pleasant trip up one of the easiest stretches of trail in the Sierra in lovely Lyell Canyon next to meadows and the meandering Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne River. After an ascent out of Lyell Canyon, a picturesque alpine lake is reached below Donohue Pass. From here, there are a couple ways to reach the Lyell Glacier, but I’ve found the most scenic is to leave the John Muir Trail before it switchbacks to begin the final push to Donohue Pass and ascend west up meadows to an alpine lake with a stellar view of Mount Lyell. From the lake, some talus and low angle granite slabs lead up the northeast ridge of Mount Maclure to some glacial lakes and the snowfield of Lyell “Glacier”. Cross the glacier heading for the northwest ridge and ascend the class 3/4 ridge; the hardest moves are near the bottom and then the angle lessens for the final couple hundred feet of vertical to the summit.  Retrace steps to the pass between Lyell and Maclure and ascend Mount Maclure’s SW slope which is mostly class 2. Both Maclure and Lyell provide amazing views of the surrounding region, including the Ritter Range, Cathedral Range, Clark Range, Sierra Crest and Yosemite Valley. From Mount Maclure descend the class 3 southwest chute to the upper reaches of Hutchings Creek basin. The basin is divided into two lobes by Peak 12,358, but the southern lobe is far more scenic with the great cliffs of Mount Lyell’s western face, Mount Maclure and the granitic north side of Peak 12,767 towering above. These peaks provide an awesome backdrop from the many alpine tarns and lakes in the remote basin.

Annotated view from Mount Florence (large version here):

View north from Mount Lyell (large version here):

Off-Trail Portion Close-up:

Lyell Glacier and Lyell Canyon from Mount Maclure (large version here):

From Hutchings Creek Basin, traverse to the south ridge of Mount Florence, gaining the ridge most easily at the broad saddle between point 11,647 and Mount Florence. The ascent of Mount Florence is straightforward class 2 on large talus blocks which can be a bit cumbersome at times. Mount Florence has one of the best views in Yosemite with an amazing panorama including most of Yosemite National Park.  From Mount Florence descend talus and sand down the west ridge and then more cumbersome talus down to Lake 10,541 ft, a classic Sierra gem. The north face of Mount Florence towers above this beautiful lake with striking blue waters.  From Lake 10,541 head north and northwest traversing easy off-trail terrain before descending into the Lewis Creek drainage to meet up with the Lewis Creek Trail at ~9,600 ft. Take the trail to Vogelsang Pass, Vogelsang Lake and the Vogelsang High Sierra Camp. Complete the loop by going to Tuolumne Pass and taking the Rafferty Creek Trail back to Lyell Canyon.