Goat Mountain

What do do in the afternoon before Bago & Rixford the next day?  Goat Mountain is a classic big and sustained Sierra hill climb with an outstanding panoramic view of the High Sierra at the top.  From Road’s End in Kings Canyon to the summit is 7,000 ft of vertical in around 11 miles and the grade is steep at times. The majority of the gain is accomplished on the well-traveled Copper Creek Trail departing from Road’s End. The first switchbacks can be quite hot midday as I discovered, but there are excellent views of Kings Canyon including the Grand Sentinel immediately across the Canyon. As one ascends, the vegetation gradually changes to pine and fir trees and the temperature cools.

About 7.5 miles from the trailhead just below the pass that drops into Granite Basin, leave the trail and take a faint use path north (or go cross country) toward a meadow area containing the fork of Copper Creek that drains Grouse Lake. Along this traverse there are lovely views of Mount Clarence King and Mount Gardiner. A short ascent from this meadow leads to beautiful Grouse Lake which is surrounded by granite slabs and clumps of pine trees in quintessential Sierra fashion. From above Grouse Lake there are nice views of the Great Western Divide. It’s all cross country past Grouse Lake up the basin, but the terrain is easy with friendly, low angle granite slabs virtually the entire way up to the foot of Goat Mountain.  The lower part of the final ascent up Goat is loose but becomes more solid in the upper portion with large talus blocks near the top. The view from Goat Mountain’s summit is simply amazing and worth the return trip so soon after my climb last October as part of the Monarch Divide Semi-Loop. It’s truly a remarkable point with a sweeping panorama from the Evolution area to the Kaweahs. The centerpiece of the view overlooks the South Fork Kings Canyon and the Muro Blanco with the peaks of the King Spur most prominent, including Mount Clarence King, Mount Cotter and Mount Gardiner. I also enjoyed the view looking to the Kings-Kern Divide including Mount Stanford, Caltech Peak and Mount Ericsson. Beyond the Kings-Kern Divide Mount Williamson and Mount Whitney were clearly visible. The good news is that once you’re on top of Goat Mountain, it’s virtually all downhill back to Road’s End. The Copper Creek Trail is fairly nice for downhill running with no brush and less rocks than some of the other trails out of Kings Canyon. GPS route here.

“Lion Loop” – Lion Rock and Triple Divide Peak

The “Lion Loop” is a spectacular large loop that I designed out of Wolverton utilizing the High Sierra Trail and the Tablelands to access one of the most remote corners of the High Sierra along the Great Western Divide. Lion Lake is the centerpiece feature of the route and is absolutely stunning with Triple Divide Peak and Lion Rock creating an impressive background against its azure waters. The entire region is highly scenic with a rugged and wild feeling that is among the finest in all of the High Sierra.  Strava route here.

I started at 3:25 a.m. and had about 2.5 hours of nighttime running through Bearpaw meadows. Continuing to Tamarack Lake I gazed up at the impressive granite domes and faces lining the canyon. Beyond Tamarack Lake, I made my way efficiently up granite slabs and benches until the last 500 vertical to the summit of Lion Rock. There is some loose rock in this final scramble section and the class 3 route was not immediately obvious, but not hidden either and I soon found myself at the summit enjoying a magnificent view in all directions, but the favorite angle was down to Lion Lake glistening in the early morning sunlight framed by the triangular-shaped Triple Divide Peak. From the summit of Lion Rock I decided to attempt descending the northeast chute. At first the downclimbing was easy but then I reached a crux portion – the final few feet to get into the chute proper was pretty smooth granite with few features. I’m not a rock climber so I was not comfortable with most of the options until I found a solution across the face and into the chute that I could manage. It was probably low 5th class. There might have been a third class access point somewhere, but I didn’t find it and I’m thinking access is much easier when the chute is filled with snow. After gently lowering myself through the remainder of the extremely loose and steep chute, travel was surprisingly straightforward and efficient to Lion Lake where I enjoyed the stupendous views of the lake and surroundings every step of the way. 

Rounding my way around Lion Lake, I then went up to Lion Lake Pass. From the pass, I went around a buttress to beautiful Glacier Lake. The lake is tucked in under an impressive rock face and reminds me of Precipice Lake along the High Sierra Trail. The view from the lake down Cloud Canyon and the Whaleback are equally impressive. From Glacier Lake, I took a loose chute up Triple Divide’s north face with some fun class 3 scrambling in the upper reaches. Triple Divide Peak is aptly named as it divides the three primary river drainages of the Southern Sierra: the Kings, Kern and Kaweah.  From Triple Divide I returned back to Glacier Lake and just below Lion Lake Pass before traversing toward Copper Mine Pass. Instead of going to the pass I ascended the peak at the head of basin dividing Cloud Canyon and Deadman Canyon – “Copper Mine Peak.” This peak featured more amazing views down both of these canyons. From the summit of Copper Mine Peak an old use trail heads west to a saddle for easy access into Deadman Basin. In this area I passed by some rusty, old and rudimentary mining artifacts. The trek across Deadman Basin to Horn Col was spectacular with gorgeous views down Deadman canyon. From Horn Col, I traversed across the basin to Pterodactyl Pass and then rounded Big Bird Peak’s shoulder to the Tablelands. Descending the Tablelands through the Marble Fork of the Kaweah River was fast I was soon at the Pear Lake backcountry ranger outpost and on the maintained trail. From here it was a fairly quick jog over the last 6 miles back to Wolverton for a 15h42m minute day. Strava route here.